Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Managing Food Allergy Anxiety April 20, 2017

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According to a study out of the Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, children with food allergies are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their non-allergic peers.  And, the more foods they are allergic to, the more likely they are to internalize those feelings of helplessness and vulnerability.

 

How does anxiety present itself in children?  What are the signs parents should look for?

Because children often lack the ability to identify the source of their stress and articulate their feelings clearly, anxiety tends to present in a number of different ways.  Some of these include:

  • stomach aches
  • headaches
  • clinging
  • avoidance: not wanting to go to events or school
  • changes in sleep and eating
  • tearfulness
  • daily persistent worries

 

Periods in a child’s development also make them more susceptible to anxious feelings; such as ages 7-10 when kids are old enough to understand serious health risks but are still too young to manage their fears efficiently.  Similarly, pre-adolescents (tweens ages 10-14) typically develop an awareness of germs, disasters and things that could possibly go wrong, making this age range primed for feelings of nervousness and worry.

 

What can parents do to help their children manage their anxiety?

  1. First and foremost, parents need to model calm. (More on that below…)
  2. When speaking about their food allergies, frame risk in a positive way.  For example, “reading ingredient labels, asking questions and carrying your epinephrine will help keep you safe;” “eating peanuts may make you feel sick;” “having regular cheese can make it hard for you to swallow and breathe…”.  DO NOT talk to kids about death, dying or their mortality.
  3. Give them words for their emotions so that they can express themselves and relieve some of that private, pent-up worry.
  4. Validate their feelings.  Anxiety about food allergies can spill over into more generalized anxiety.  Their fears and perspectives are real to them.
  5. Tell your child a story about a time you had anxiety.  And, if possible, maybe something you did to overcome it!
  6. Explain to your child that everyone experiences some level of anxiety.  It’s a normal part of being human.  But when it becomes overwhelming we need to talk about it to help let it go.
  7. Encourage your daughter or son to socialize with friends and family.  Being with others is a great distraction and reminds them of the support that surrounds them.
  8. Teach them skills to relieve stress, such as breathing techniques, getting out to exercise, or compartmentalizing the discussion of food allergy worries to 10 minutes a day and then moving on.  These are important techniques for life!
  9. Reassure your child that they are in good hands, both at home AND away, like at school, at grandma’s, etc.  Kids need to know they are secure and that those in charge know what they’re doing.
  10. Empower them!  Practice what to say to their friends, family, teachers, and restaurant staff about their food allergies.  Teach them what to do in case they suspect they’re having an allergic reaction.  Work together to read ingredient labels and manufacturing warnings.  Allow them to ask questions at the doctor’s office. The more capable they feel, the more in control they will be!

 

What about us?  

As food allergy parents, we – too – are familiar with the stress and anxiety related to the management and realities of food allergies.  It is as, OR MORE, important that we manage our own anxious feelings as parents so that we can be a model of calm and security for our kids.

 

Anxiety – in all forms – clouds good decision-making (it’s science!).  Keeping worries in check allows us to be more effective parents by approaching decisions and assessing situations with cautiousness and calm.

 

When adults feel out of control, they tend to overcompensate.  This primal need to protect our children kicks into overdrive, leaving parents spinning their wheels in a world they cannot sanitize or make safe enough.

 

Kids tend to absorb the perspective of their parents and they can become frightened if adults around them are very stressed or scared.  Therefore, it’s critical for parents to adopt a healthy attitude towards food, food allergies and the greater world to help their children manage their own food allergies.

 

What can we do to keep ourselves calm?

  1. Find support.  Connect with other food allergy parents or spend time with understanding friends.  Socializing reminds us that we’re not alone with our concerns.  Feel free to use Allergy Shmallergy’s Facebook page to post questions or connect with like-minded parents.
  2. Arm yourself with information.  Familiarize yourself with food labeling laws, causes and symptoms of a reaction, and your emergency action plan.  If you can, learn to cook!  In short, empower yourself!
  3. Adopt simple solutions for your food allergy hurdles.  Resist the pressure to be the perfect baker, for example, and focus on surrounding your child with LOVE.
  4. Trust in others who’ve shown understanding towards food allergies.  A lot of food allergy parents only feel their child is safe when he or she in in their total control.  It’s important to let go a little and let others help.  If you’re at a friend’s house, let the host find a safe snack  – you can still approve the ingredient list, but it will give you a window into their decision-making abilities.  Let your child’s teacher become his or her food allergy-ally while they’re at school.  Every child needs a village.  More importantly, every parent needs one too.
  5. Prepare and approach food-related situations with CAUTION without assuming CATASTROPHE.
  6. Get out and exercise.  Talk a nature walk.  Have a date night.  Be sure to find outlets and activities that bring you joy.

 

 

 

 

Fun for Everyone: Candy Bar Birthday Party April 12, 2017

I wish I could take credit for this adorable idea.  But I can’t.  My friend is just a genius.

 

Her own kids aren’t allergic, but my thoughtful and creative friend had kids with food allergies on her mind when she thought about what special treat her daughter could share with ALL of her party guests.  Like my friend, many parents are concerned with how to be inclusive of guests with food allergies.  Sometimes, the best answer is also the simplest.

 

After singing a rowdy chorus of “Happy Birthday” to our favorite 7 year old, the kids were each given a festive party bag that they could fill with any (or ALL) of their favorite candy.  Best of all, everything was dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free and most was also gluten-free.  There’s nothing that makes a child happier than being included in on the fun!

 

Plus, no goodie bag needed!  The kids all got to bring their loot home.  HUGE bonus in my opinion!

 

If you’re going to replicate this fantastic idea, I would recommend a few things:

  1.  Check Allergy Shmallergy’s Safe List of Nut-Free Candy page.  This is not a comprehensive list.  And, it doesn’t account for other allergies.  But you’ll find that many of the candies listed are also dairy-free, egg-free and gluten-free.  Read ingredient lists carefully and if you have any doubts of an item’s safety, snap a photo and email the child’s parent to verify.
  2. Save ingredient lists and bring them to the party.  If anything needs to be double-checked, you’ll have all your information at hand.
  3. Be careful when serving similar looking items (like M&Ms and Skittles).  Not only is chance of cross-contamination a concern with unwrapped candy, but I’ve seen unsafe candy fall into safe candy bowls.  For the purposes of a party, I would stick to the idea that “everything on the table is safe for party guests” principle.

 

Look at this fun, inviting table set up!
Looking for containers and scoops like the ones above?

Set of 12 Clear Plastic Candy Scoops

Penny Candy Jars (set of 2)

Amcan Scalloped Container, Large

Vista Premium Quality Plastic 10″ Serving Bowl (set of 2)


  
Smarties.  A classic!


Caught red handed!  My son and his best friend/brother of the birthday girl.

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

IMPORTANT: EpiPen Recall April 1, 2017

IMG_3211Expanding on its recall in other countries, Mylan is now recalling EpiPens in the United States.

 

The recall began when reports of two devices outside of the U.S. failed to activate due to a potential defect in a supplier component.

 

According to Mylan, “The potential defect could make the device difficult to activate in an emergency (failure to activate or increased force needed to activate) and have significant health consequences for a patient experiencing a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). ”

 

As a precaution, Mylan is recalling EpiPens made my their manufacturer, Meridian Medical Technologies, between December 2015 and July 2016.  This recall applies to both their EpiPen Jr. dose (0.15mg) and their regular dose (0.3mg).   The recall does NOT affect generic EpiPens introduced in December 2016.

 

Please see below for lot numbers and expiration dates.  Remember to check any EpiPen sets you may have including those outside of your home (for example, at school, daycare or a relative’s house).  Mylan said that recalled EpiPens will be replaced at no cost to the consumer.

 

For more information as well as product replacement information, please visit Mylan’s site directly.

 

Mylan EpiPen recall April 2017*Please share widely with friends and family as well as school administrators and nurses.*

 

UPDATE:

If your EpiPens are affected by the recall:

  1.  Contact Stericycle to obtain a voucher code for a free, new replacement EpiPen.  Stericycle: 877-650-3494.  Stericycle will send you a pre-paid return package to ship back your recalled EpiPens.
  2. Bring your voucher information to your local pharmacy to receive your free replacement EpiPens.
  3. Send your recalled EpiPens back to Stericycle using their packaging.  Remember: DO NOT send back your recalled EpiPens until you have replacements in hand.

 

Mylan continues to update its recall page with their latest information at mylan.com/epipenrecall.

 

Essential Items for Families with Food Allergies – Portable Food Carriers March 28, 2017

Filed under: Parent Sanity — malawer @ 11:00 am
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Food allergy parents are accustomed to prepping safe food at home and taking it on-the-go to parties, school functions, and family gatherings.  Here are a few items that might make carrying safe food just a little easier!

 

Portable Slice of Pizza or Pie?

 

Take a gluten-free or dairy-free slice of pizza to a party?  Who knew there was a container just for that purpose?!  This Brick Oven Pizza Saver looks like it’s perfectly sized to transport both pizza and maybe even a slice of cookie cake or pie!

Brick oven slice saver

 

 

Individual Cupcake Holders:

 

Both this reusable (by Fox Run) and these disposable cupcake holders (both via Amazon) are the PERFECT container to tote a peanut-free, dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free cupcake to a birthday party!

 

Fox Run Cupcake Holder

Cupcake Supply Co Indiv Cupcake holder

 

Removable Labels:

When sending your child with a safe snack or special treat – OR when labeling your own lunch at the office – the best way to ensure it doesn’t get mixed up with someone else’s is to clearly label it.  These removable labels by Avery do just the trick:

Avery Labels

 

Hot Lunch!

 

If your kids are itching for a hot lunch, but school lunches aren’t a safe option, then you absolutely need a thermos that will keep your meal warm for up to 5 hours and fit neatly into your lunchbox or work bag.

 

Thermos

 

And, while you’re packing your lunchbox, why not add Sistema’s four-piece cutlery set.  It connects handles to fork, spoon, kid friendly-knife and chopsticks – making it a synch to grab on-the-go.

Sistema Klipo

 

For Safe Restaurant Dining:

 

If you’re allergic to soy, you’ve probably already toted salad dressing to restaurants.  Allergic to gluten/wheat, I’d bet you’ve stashed tamari in your purse as you meet friends for sushi.  OXO Good Grips On-The-Go Silicone Squeeze Bottles allow you to do just that in a small, spill-free way!

OXO Squeeze containers

 

We want to hear from you!  What other items do you find useful for living with your food allergies? 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

6 Tips for Traveling with Food Allergies March 7, 2017

pool-690034_1920 via pixabay

 

Spring break is on the horizon!  Can you smell the fresh air already?  Are you mentally packing your bags? (I am!)

 

Here are a few tips when traveling with food allergies:

locking-knob-883059_1920 via pixabay

  1.  Call your airline and inquire about their food allergy policy in advance.  Ask specifically about early boarding and in-flight announcements.
  2. Most airlines will allow passengers to board the plane early in order to wipe down surfaces (this includes seat backs, seat belts, tray tables and knobs, armrests). Be sure to bring enough baby wipes or antibacterial wipes (such as Wet Ones) to cover all the legs of your travel.  Again, ask about pre-boarding at the gate.
  3. Carry your epinephrine auto-injectors and antihistamines ON BOARD.  Do not pack these away in your luggage.  [*ALLERGY SHMALLERGY TIP*: Zyrtec makes dissolvable tablets which eliminate the worry over bringing liquids through security as well as anything spilling in your bags.]
  4. If you’re traveling to a warm weather destination, you’ll need to remember to keep your epinephrine auto-injectors at room temperature – even while enjoying the beach or pool.  Pack a cool pack (like this one) and an insulated bag (like this cute lunch bag).  Store the cool packs in your hotel’s mini-fridge (who needs a $15 bag of M&Ms anyway!?) or plan on ordering a to-go cup of ice to keep the medicine cool poolside.
  5. A hotel or resort’s food services manager can usually help you navigate menus.  On our last vacation, the food services manager had food allergies himself and was invaluable in hunting down ingredients and safe alternatives for our family.  Befriend this fantastic person!
  6. If you’re planning on visiting an amusement park, taking a hike or being similarly active, consider packing a backpack into your luggage (or use one as your carry-on!).  You’ll need to bring your epinephrine auto-injectors wherever you go – especially on vacation when you’re away from home cooking, familiar restaurants and local knowledge of hospitals and doctors.  Backpacks can make carrying it easier depending on the activity – simply slip the insulated bag into your backpack and go!

 

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Two more notes:

  • Airline travelers should bring their own snacks/meals on board flights to ensure their safety.
  • Refrain from using airplane blankets and pillows as allergen residue may reside there.
  • Bring a baby or antibacterial wipe to the bathroom to wipe down door  and knob handles.

 

 

 

Even MORE Celebrities with Food Allergies March 2, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — malawer @ 11:00 am

You’re not alone if you’re living with a food allergy.  Plenty of well known people carry epinephrine too!

 

Check it out:

Just When You Felt Like the Only One With a Food Allergy

You’re Definitely Not Alone: More Celebrities with Food Allergies

 

And, here are some more:

 

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Keep reading to see Food Allergy parents…

 

 

Athletes:

Justin Morneau, Twins Baseball Player (gluten)

 

WWE Star:

Daniel Bryan (allergic to soy and is a vegan)

 

Actor:
Kenton Duty (chocolate and wheat, formerly dairy)

Ashley Tisdale (dairy)

Sabrina Carpenter (apples and peaches)

Rowan Blanchard (shellfish)

Madison Pettis (dairy)

Rio Mangini (peanuts)

 

Singers:

Ariana Grande (bananas and shellfish)

Josh Turner (gluten)

Kelly Clarkson (peanuts)

Justin Bieber (celery)

Liam Payne (olives)

 

 

Comedian/Playwright/Actor/Musician:

Steve Martin (shellfish)

 

Food Allergy Parents:

Sarah Jessica Parker & Matthew Broderick (son allergic to peanuts)

Bill & Hillary Clinton (daughter Chelsea sensitive to gluten)

Gwyneth Paltrow & Chris Martin (son allergic to gluten and daughter allergic dairy)

 

 

 

The Fire Drill – 5 Key Lessons from an Intensely Scary Night February 22, 2017

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I had been home from the restaurant only ten minutes with my preschooler almost tucked into bed when I got the call.

 

“Miles isn’t feeling well. He’s nauseous and is having terrible asthma. We’re heading home early,“ my husband informed me calmly. My husband and two sons left our regular sushi dinner to attend a tennis lesson, still chewing as they walked out the door.

 

My oldest son has suffered from asthma since he was 10 months old, but this just didn’t sound like the typical onset of asthma for him. Something about Eric’s voice suggested something “other.” “Do you think it could be a food allergy reaction?” I asked.

 

“I don’t know; but we’re getting home as quickly as possible.”

 

Completely abandoning my daughter in her bed, I walked to our emergency medication and unsheathed the freshest EpiPen. I was reviewing our emergency action plan as headlights tore into the driveway.

 

Calm but focused, I greeted my son at the door. He was red and hot and choking out words as I tried to check in with him about his symptoms. He could barely speak. He felt nauseous and clutched his stomach as he made his way into the bathroom, afraid he would throw up. His description of his symptoms came out in – sometimes inaudible – spurts. He was fighting for breath. He felt and looked worse than I had ever seen him.

 

While my hand calmly rubbed his back and my eyes scanned his face assessing the situation, a million thoughts raced through me in a nanosecond. Was it something he ate? Was he possibly reacting to a new allergen? Was this anaphylaxis or pure asthma…or both? The flu and other upper respiratory viruses were spreading so rampantly that nearly a third of my son’s class was out that week. And, he had mentioned having a headache and feeling a little nauseous after school – something that had seemingly subsided by dinner.

 

No matter how I weighed my options, a few small words reverberated in my brain: two systems. Most emergency action plans state that if two or more essential systems (gut/stomach, lungs, skin, heart) are affected in an allergic reaction, epinephrine should be administered immediately. I held up the auto-injectors behind my son’s back, signaling to my husband that we might need to use them. Neither of us have had to use an auto-injector on my son before (knock on everything wooden). We knew it was probably the right call now. We were both looking for the other to validate that decision.

 

As with all things, I wanted the use of the auto-injector to be the absolute right decision. I called my father-in-law, a doctor of more than 40 years, for one last vote on how to proceed. It was a brief conversation. “Get him breathing! Give him albuterol, I’m coming right over.”

 

Having caught sight of me waving the EpiPen in the air to my husband, my son had now begun to sweat with panic – making everything much worse. I sat him on the couch and tried to cool him off for just a moment – considering the facts again. Asthma. Nausea. No throat, mouth, or tongue swelling. No hives. No clear relationship between this reaction and food – but always a real possibility.

 

I looked at my sweet boy once again, suffering for breath, and noticed his pallor wasn’t quite as red any longer; it was now tingeing blue. I grabbed the epinephrine and pulled off the safety cap. At that very moment, my brother-in-law (another doctor) and father-in-law walked through the door. With stethoscope in hand and exuding a calm and caring in doses that make me tear up in appreciation even now, they examined my son and set him up on a nebulizer – a machine that delivers asthma and other respiratory medications as a penetrating, breathable mist.

 

We monitored Miles’ pulse (which was steady) and his breathing (which was labored and difficult). It took a lot of medication and effort, but Miles began processing air more efficiently. I didn’t realize until the second hour of treatment that I had been clutching his auto-injector the entire time.

 

As Miles’ color returned and the dust began to settle, he began to recall details about his day – clues that might have been helpful earlier. Like, the fact that he experienced asthma during recess at school. As he continued to improve, we noted that he was simultaneously experiencing a migraine, which can bring about nausea. Together, we determined that this was likely an acute asthma attack and not a result of his food allergies.

 

All four adults watched Miles for another several hours (well into the night) before anyone was willing to even entertain sleep. And, by then, sleep didn’t come so easily. I awoke in a gasping sweat several times that night and slipped into my son’s room to check on him. At around 5:45 am, I placed my hand on his back and he broke the quiet of the pre-dawn, humorously stating, “Mommy. Your hand is like a furnace!” Smiling and with great relief, I knew the sun would come up that morning and all would be well.

When I relayed these events to my own father, he captured it perfectly. “You had a fire drill last night.” We certainly did. And, as with any good training exercise (intentional or not), we learned some valuable lessons that night.

 

  1. Trust your instincts. I knew we needed to use epinephrine. Had there not been two doctors in the family within arms’ distance from me, I would have absolutely used it. And, so would my husband. Even though it was not anaphylaxis and everything turned out well, I STILL regret not having used the auto-injector sooner. I had my doubts about a food allergy reaction for a number of reasons. The afternoon nausea as well as the absence of hives and swelling gave me pause – which is why I called my father-in-law. But, did being right about his diagnosis make me feel better about my hesitation? No. Severe food allergic reactions can present themselves with a number of symptoms and they can escalate very quickly.

 

  1. Always, ALWAYS carry your epinephrine auto-injector with you. EVERY TIME. And, make sure that your friends, family and/or whoever is caring for your child knows how to use it (procedures are slightly different for Auvi-Q, the Adrenaclick and the EpiPen, so I recommend reviewing often). In our case, we accidentally forgot to transfer the auto-injectors from my purse to my husband’s bag, taking for granted that he’d no longer be around food; out only for an hour to play tennis. Thankfully, we live two minutes from the tennis courts. But had they been further, my husband would ABSOLUTELY have needed those auto-injectors.

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  1. As if you needed an extra reason to carry your auto-injectors: Those who have asthma are more likely to suffer from severe food allergic reactions– particularly if that asthma is not well-controlled. Asthma can complicate food allergies. Asthma occurs when there is narrowing of the airways, making it difficult for an individual to take in the proper amount of air. In my son’s case, his lungs were taking in so little air that initially my father-in-law couldn’t hear any movement with his stethoscope. No wonder he was turning blue. In an emergency situation, epinephrine can be used to treat a severe asthma attack. We were milliseconds from using it.

 

  1. If you use an epinephrine auto-injector you must go the nearest emergency room immediately. This is not because you gave the injection. Rather, those having severe food allergic reactions need additional medication and treatment. Furthermore, patients can suffer something call a bi-phasic reaction – that is, a second, delayed bout of anaphylaxis. It is estimated that up to 20% of patients suffer such a reaction.

 

  1. Once Miles went to sleep, we recapped the night with my father-in-law, who’s served in some fast-paced emergency rooms. I’ve been repeating something he said that night to everyone who will listen:

“We used to tell surgical residents,” he began, “‘If you’re considering performing a tracheotomy, then you need to do a tracheotomy.’”  The same holds true for anaphylaxis. If you think you might need to use an auto-injector, then you DO need to use one. If you’re considering it, then the time is now.

 

I’m beyond grateful that our story ends happily.  I pray you all never have to experience the intensity of a severe reaction (whether that be from food allergies or acute asthma).  But I hope that by sharing our experience and the lessons we learned, your story will end happily, too.

 


 

Essential Resource:

I can’t recommend enough this informative piece on when to give what medication during a severe allergic reaction. The information contained in this article echoed in my head during the above incident.

 

From the Food Allergy Treatment Talk blog:

Putting the Fire by Dr. Brian Schroer