Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Teal Pumpkin Project for Food Allergy Awareness During Halloween October 27, 2014

Filed under: Holiday,Preparedness — malawer @ 12:47 pm
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My kids and I were asked to do a news segment yesterday for Fox 5 News about Food Allergies during Halloween.  As we all know, having food allergies during a food centric holiday can be very difficult.  Luckily, FARE aims to make that easier with its #TealPumpkinProject.  Please watch the clip and pass it on!  I think it goes without say that Halloween would be even MORE fun if it were more inclusive and SAFE for all children!

 

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Our segment is running throughout today, but in case you missed it or don’t live in the DC market – here you go:

Teal Pumpkin Project for food allergy awareness – DC News FOX 5 DC WTTG.

 

And, please read my next post for Trick or Treating tips and non-food Halloween ideas!

Teal Pumpkin Project
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Halloween, Safety and Teal Pumpkins October 24, 2014

Filed under: Holiday,Preparedness — malawer @ 11:45 am
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  • Teal Pumpkin Decoration For Food Allergy Awareness
 

Halloween is a particularly tricky time for kids with food allergies.  I’m always amazed at how many houses give out treats laden with peanuts, tree nuts and other common allergens.  Although my son understands that he can get safe candy from me when the trick-or-treat is a no-go, it’s hard not to be disappointed for him.   Holidays routinely make kids with food allergies feel left out and Halloween is king among them.

 

There ARE a few things you can do to make this Halloween safe and pure fun:

 

1.  Carry a variety of safe treats for your child to choose from so that he/she can get a replacement treat when the neighbor’s doesn’t cut it;

2.  Always carry your epinephrine while you trick-or-treat and remind your child NOT to eat any candy until you get home to ensure its safety;

3.  Don’t forget to read the labels of even candy you know to be safe.  When miniaturized, manufacturers often use shared equipment that isn’t a problem at the candy’s regular size package.   Read, read and re-read;

4.  Always carry your cell phone.  In addition to taking adorable shots of your kids sprinting from house to house, you may want to have it with you in the unlikely event that a reaction occurs.

 

And, look for houses with TEAL PUMPKINS.  The non-profit Food Allergy Research Education (FARE) is encouraging families who are offering non-food treats to place a teal pumpkin on their doorstep to let kids with food allergies know that they can safely trick or treat at your house. Read more about the Teal Pumpkin Project here.

 

In that vein, here are some great non-food options to offer.  Order today so that they’ll arrive before Halloween!

 
 
                                       

Glow in the Dark Vampire Teeth

Glow In The Dark Fangs - 12 per pack

Mini cans of Play-Doh

GlowStick Bracelets

Slap Bracelets

Head Boppers (remember these,  parents?!!  Flashback!)

Flashing Rings (for the Pop Princesses that visit) 

EYE BOUNCE BALL

Bouncing Eyeballs

Creepy Glow Fingers

Zombie Eye Patches

  • US Toy Glow Witch Fingers CostumeZombie Eye Patches

 
 

 

 

Happy Haunting, everyone!

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

Put This on Your To Do List Today: Food Allergy Action Plan October 15, 2014

Severe Allergy Action Plan

One of the most helpful food allergy documents I ever received first came, not from our wonderful allergist, but from our  pediatrician.  An Allergy Action Plan is a vital document for you and your family.  It clearly outlines what to do and who to call in a variety of allergic situations.  It spells out how much medication to give and reminds the reader if the patient is asthmatic.

We keep copies of our Allergy Action Plan everywhere.  I have one in our emergency medication basket in the kitchen, one in the car glove compartment, one in our Emergency On-The-Go Kit, one at school, one at religious school, and others at camp.  Now that I’m writing this, I think I should give a copy to my parents and in-laws so that they can familiarize themselves with the right course of action and know where to access this crucial information in case my son is staying with them (even if his On-The-Go Kit also contains one).

To complete your Food Allergy Action Plan today:

1.  First download Allergy Shmallergy’s:  AS – Severe Allergy Action Plan;

2.  Bring to your allergist or pediatrician to fill out.  This is not for a parent/patient to complete;

3.  Make more copies than you think is necessary to display/distribute to anywhere you/your child keeps epinephrine;

4.  Date the document and remember to update it every 12 months.