Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

What is Lupin Allergy and Why You Should Care June 26, 2017

Lupin allergy is on the rise.  But most people haven’t even heard of lupin in the first place.    Travelers to Europe, Australia, Canada, the Mediterranean and even the U.S. should become familiar with it.  So should those who are gluten-free as well as those who have a peanut or soy allergy.

 

Read the article I recently wrote for the Allergy & Asthma Network, entitled “Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?” to find out what lupin is, where it is found and who is most at risk for a reaction.

Screenshot 2017-06-26 09.27.51


Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?
from the Allergy & Asthma Network dated June 14, 2017

 

Have you heard of lupin? Don’t feel bad; most Americans haven’t heard of it either. But that’s likely to change.

 

What is lupin?

Lupin (or lupine) beans are legumes – putting them in the same plant family as the peanut. Lupin beans are high in antioxidants, dietary fiber and protein and low in starch. And like all legumes, they are gluten-free.

Lupin beans are commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine. Sometimes ground into flour and blended into regular wheat flour, lupin is also widely used in Europe and Australia. There, lupin is frequently found in baked goods and pastas as well as breads, sauces, beverages (such as beer) and meat-based products like sausage and hamburgers.

Lupin is showing up in the United States as well. It appears most often as a substitute for gluten or soy in free-from products as well as replacement for genetically modified ingredients and animal proteins (primarily dairy and egg).

 

Can you be allergic to lupin?

Although not one of the “Top 8” allergens, lupin is beginning to make headlines in the food allergy world. For many, eating products containing lupin is completely safe. However, for a few, lupin can trigger an allergic reaction. The odds of having a reaction are higher if you already have a peanut allergy. This is called cross-sensitivity.

There is no evidence that lupin allergy is more severe than other allergens. Like all allergic reactions, symptoms vary. Those who are allergic to lupin have reported reactions ranging from hives, swelling of the lips and face, to gastrointestinal and respiratory distress, and cardiovascular issues.

 

Do manufacturers label for lupin?

Due to the frequent use of lupin in European and Australian packaged goods, coupled with reports of allergic reaction, manufacturers in the European Union are required to label for lupin. But this requirement is voluntary in places like the United States, Canada, Australia and other parts of the world where you may find lupin listed among other ingredients without special emphasis. U.S. laws and regulations only require labeling to highlight the Top 8 allergens.

Those allergic to lupin or unsure should be careful of unlabeled, over-the-counter baked goods like pastries sold at a bakery, bread rolls served at a restaurant or beer at a local pub.

 

Other names for lupin are:

  • Lupin Bean/Flour
  • Lupine Bean/Flour
  • Lupin Seed
  • Lupini
  • Termes
  • Altramuz
  • Tarwi
  • Termos

While lupin is currently popular in Europe, its presence is increasing in the United States and elsewhere. As the demand for gluten-free and other free-from goods grows, so may the use of lupin.

If you are concerned you may be allergic to lupin, speak to your board-certified allergist to discuss level of risk, testing and prevention strategies. Avoiding the allergen is the only way to prevent an allergic reaction.

 

 

 

 

Identifying and Recognizing Emotions May 2, 2017

emoji-653309_1920 pixabay

 

As parents, we’re reliant on our children to express themselves.  And as food allergy parents, knowing how they feel is our best barometer for understanding how our kids are handling their food allergies, what’s going on around them vis-a-vis food and friends and what’s on their mind.  And, in order to do that, kids must first be able to recognize and identify those emotions.

 

But how (and when) do we begin?

There’s no such thing as too young to start this conversation.  Whether your kids are 2 or 22, getting in touch with how you’re feeling at a given moment can clarify almost any situation, reduce stress and make way for better decision-making.

 

Here are a few ways to get started:

1.  Puts Words to Feelings:  Let your children know that their emotions have names.  Point out those feelings as you see them.  “It looks like doing art makes you feel calm;” “When your brother takes your toys without asking, that makes you angry;” “Wow, you are really excited about going to the zoo today!”

 

2.  I Second that Emotion:  My own daughter (now 4) gets upset and will say, “I am feeling so mad right now!”  This leads me to a second point: validate their feelings.  Praise your children when they express themselves verbally.  When my daughter tells me she’s mad I usually respond by saying, “I’m sorry you’re mad about something.  BUT, I’m really proud of you for letting me know how you’re feeling.”  This lets her know that being mad is okay.  And, it encourages her to keep talking to me about her emotions.

 

3.  Read, Discuss, Repeat:  Books are great tools for learning and describing emotions as well as helping your child identify the feelings of others.  Some great books to start with are:

Today I Feel Silly, by Jamie Lee Curtis

In My Heart: A Book of Feelings, by Jo Witek

The Color Monster: A Pop-Up Book of Feelings, by Anna Llenas

The Way I Feel, by Janan Cain

 

But you don’t need a special book to talk about emotions.  Even when reading a child’s favorite, you can help him/her explore and identify how the characters are feeling.  Ask them, “How do you think Madeline felt when she fell from the bridge?”  “Is Trixie happy when she realizes she lost her lovey?” “What is Harry thinking and feeling when he’s living at the Dursley’s?” “How would you feel if you were a firefighter headed to a fire?”  With older kids, you can even pause a movie or TV show and chat about what a character might be experiencing psychologically.

 

4.  Touch Base:  Don’t ignore opportunities to check in with your child about their food allergies.  Parents often need to walk a fine line between acknowledging the pain, exclusion and frustration and keeping things *positive*.  We are quick to brush aside things that cause our kids pain and sadness and paint it over with positivity and sunshine.  But we need to recognize and call out those negative emotions too – because regardless of our rose-colored glasses, our kids are likely experiencing all of the emotions (good and bad) that come along with food allergies.

 

Recently, when my 12 year old son and I learned that his number one favorite treat, Krispy Kreme doughnuts would no longer be safe for him, we stopped to talk about it.  He acknowledged how insanely frustrated he felt and how disappointing this news was.  He felt depressed and disheartened – not over a doughnut exactly but rather over another example of food options that more-often-than-not shrink and exclude him.  After mockingly shaking our fists in rage and putting a name on everything he was feeling, my son was able to move on emotionally and focus on other special desserts he could look forward to.

(more…)

 

Managing Food Allergy Anxiety April 20, 2017

anxiety-2019928_1920 pixabay

 

According to a study out of the Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, children with food allergies are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their non-allergic peers.  And, the more foods they are allergic to, the more likely they are to internalize those feelings of helplessness and vulnerability.

 

How does anxiety present itself in children?  What are the signs parents should look for?

Because children often lack the ability to identify the source of their stress and articulate their feelings clearly, anxiety tends to present in a number of different ways.  Some of these include:

  • stomach aches
  • headaches
  • clinging
  • avoidance: not wanting to go to events or school
  • changes in sleep and eating
  • tearfulness
  • daily persistent worries

 

Periods in a child’s development also make them more susceptible to anxious feelings; such as ages 7-10 when kids are old enough to understand serious health risks but are still too young to manage their fears efficiently.  Similarly, pre-adolescents (tweens ages 10-14) typically develop an awareness of germs, disasters and things that could possibly go wrong, making this age range primed for feelings of nervousness and worry.

 

What can parents do to help their children manage their anxiety?

  1. First and foremost, parents need to model calm. (More on that below…)
  2. When speaking about their food allergies, frame risk in a positive way.  For example, “reading ingredient labels, asking questions and carrying your epinephrine will help keep you safe;” “eating peanuts may make you feel sick;” “having regular cheese can make it hard for you to swallow and breathe…”.  DO NOT talk to kids about death, dying or their mortality.
  3. Give them words for their emotions so that they can express themselves and relieve some of that private, pent-up worry.
  4. Validate their feelings.  Anxiety about food allergies can spill over into more generalized anxiety.  Their fears and perspectives are real to them.
  5. Tell your child a story about a time you had anxiety.  And, if possible, maybe something you did to overcome it!
  6. Explain to your child that everyone experiences some level of anxiety.  It’s a normal part of being human.  But when it becomes overwhelming we need to talk about it to help let it go.
  7. Encourage your daughter or son to socialize with friends and family.  Being with others is a great distraction and reminds them of the support that surrounds them.
  8. Teach them skills to relieve stress, such as breathing techniques, getting out to exercise, or compartmentalizing the discussion of food allergy worries to 10 minutes a day and then moving on.  These are important techniques for life!
  9. Reassure your child that they are in good hands, both at home AND away, like at school, at grandma’s, etc.  Kids need to know they are secure and that those in charge know what they’re doing.
  10. Empower them!  Practice what to say to their friends, family, teachers, and restaurant staff about their food allergies.  Teach them what to do in case they suspect they’re having an allergic reaction.  Work together to read ingredient labels and manufacturing warnings.  Allow them to ask questions at the doctor’s office. The more capable they feel, the more in control they will be!

 

What about us?  

As food allergy parents, we – too – are familiar with the stress and anxiety related to the management and realities of food allergies.  It is as, OR MORE, important that we manage our own anxious feelings as parents so that we can be a model of calm and security for our kids.

 

Anxiety – in all forms – clouds good decision-making (it’s science!).  Keeping worries in check allows us to be more effective parents by approaching decisions and assessing situations with cautiousness and calm.

 

When adults feel out of control, they tend to overcompensate.  This primal need to protect our children kicks into overdrive, leaving parents spinning their wheels in a world they cannot sanitize or make safe enough.

 

Kids tend to absorb the perspective of their parents and they can become frightened if adults around them are very stressed or scared.  Therefore, it’s critical for parents to adopt a healthy attitude towards food, food allergies and the greater world to help their children manage their own food allergies.

 

What can we do to keep ourselves calm?

  1. Find support.  Connect with other food allergy parents or spend time with understanding friends.  Socializing reminds us that we’re not alone with our concerns.  Feel free to use Allergy Shmallergy’s Facebook page to post questions or connect with like-minded parents.
  2. Arm yourself with information.  Familiarize yourself with food labeling laws, causes and symptoms of a reaction, and your emergency action plan.  If you can, learn to cook!  In short, empower yourself!
  3. Adopt simple solutions for your food allergy hurdles.  Resist the pressure to be the perfect baker, for example, and focus on surrounding your child with LOVE.
  4. Trust in others who’ve shown understanding towards food allergies.  A lot of food allergy parents only feel their child is safe when he or she in in their total control.  It’s important to let go a little and let others help.  If you’re at a friend’s house, let the host find a safe snack  – you can still approve the ingredient list, but it will give you a window into their decision-making abilities.  Let your child’s teacher become his or her food allergy-ally while they’re at school.  Every child needs a village.  More importantly, every parent needs one too.
  5. Prepare and approach food-related situations with CAUTION without assuming CATASTROPHE.
  6. Get out and exercise.  Talk a nature walk.  Have a date night.  Be sure to find outlets and activities that bring you joy.

 

 

 

 

Understanding the New Peanut Allergy Prevention Guidelines January 31, 2017

**Not a medical professional.  As always, please discuss specific recommendations for your child with your doctor.  The below is to inform you of pediatric guideline changes and their purpose.**

 

720px-us-nih-niaid-logo-svg

Earlier this month, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) issued new recommendations to help families prevent peanut allergies.

 

While there are a lot of intricacies involved in the research and its findings, the results are clear:  early introduction of peanuts can help prevent the development of a peanut allergy.  And, that’s big news!

 

Background:

Peanut allergies (and food allergies in general) are a growing problem.  The rate of food allergy has doubled in the last 10 years alone.  And, only 1 of every 4 children allergic to peanuts will outgrow their allergy.

 

Prior to 2000, doctors didn’t give new parents much advice about feeding their infants allergenic foods (such as milk, eggs, peanuts, fish, etc).  Beginning around 2000, the general consensus was that delayed introduction might help developing immune systems handle these proteins more efficiently.  In 2008, doctors didn’t really give parents a strong direction either way.  However, that same year, researchers compared the rate of peanut allergy among Jewish kids in the UK (where they delay introduction), to those in Israel (where they feed a peanut-based snack as some of their babies’ first foods) and were stunned to see the difference.  Children in Israel had a far smaller rate of peanut allergy than their counterparts in the United Kingdom.  It became clear doctors and researchers needed to revisit their guidance.

 

Thus, began the 5 year LEAP study (Learning Early about Peanut Allergy), one of the most successful allergy trials that has been conducted to date.  It took children with severe eczema or egg allergy and broke them into two groups: one group was fed peanuts early and one avoided them.  Published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study revealed that early introduction of peanut reduced the incidence of developing a peanut allergy by up to 80% and had lasting effects.

 

Current Recommendations:

Based on their findings, the NIAID broke down their recommendations into three categories:

 

Guideline 1:

If the baby has an egg allergy (which is inexplicably related to peanut allergy) or has severe eczema (a persistent, scaly rash associated with allergy), speak with your doctor or a specialist about testing for peanut allergy.  And, speak with her/him about best ways to proceed with introduction.

 

In their own words, the NIAID states:

“Guideline 1 recommends that if your infant has severe eczema, egg allergy, or both (conditions that increase the risk of peanut allergy), he or she should have peanut-containing foods introduced into the diet as early as 4 to 6 months of age. This will reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy.

Check with your infant’s healthcare provider before feeding your infant peanut-containing foods. He or she may choose to perform an allergy blood test or send your infant to a specialist for other tests, such as a skin prick test. The results of these tests will help to determine if peanut should be introduced into your infant’s diet and, if so, the safest way to introduce it. If your infant’s test results indicate that it is safe to introduce peanut-containing foods, the healthcare provider may recommend that you introduce peanut-containing foods to your infant at home. Or, if you prefer, the first feeding may be done in the healthcare provider’s office under supervision. On the other hand, testing may indicate that peanut should be carefully introduced at a specialist’s facility or not introduced at all because your child may already have developed an allergy to peanut.

Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for introducing peanut-containing foods to your infant.”

 

Guideline 2:

If your child has mild to moderate eczema, peanut-containing products can be introduced beginning at 6 months of age.  Check with your doctor or specialist to confirm that his/her case of eczema is considered mild to moderate and discuss introduction.

From NIAID:

“Guideline 2 suggests that if your infant has mild to moderate eczema, he or she may have peanut-containing foods introduced into the diet around 6 months of age to reduce the risk of developing peanut allergy. However, this should be done with your family’s dietary preferences in mind. If peanut-containing foods are not a regular part of your family’s diet (and your infant does not have severe eczema, egg allergy, or both), do not feel compelled to introduce peanut at such an early stage.

Your child’s healthcare provider can tell you whether your child’s eczema is mild to moderate. You may then choose to introduce peanut-containing foods at home. However, if you or your healthcare provider prefer, the first feeding can be done in the provider’s office under supervision.”

 

Guideline 3:

If your child does not have an egg allergy OR eczema, you may freely introduce peanuts with other solid foods.

 

The flow chart and summary from Science News, spells it out clearly if you need a visual.

 

 

How DO you introduce peanuts to an infant?  Do I need to look out for anything special?

  • First feeds should be offered after you have tried other first foods (such as rice cereal) so that the baby learns to suck and swallow these news textures and to ensure that your baby tolerates these typical foods.
  •  DO NOT feed babies whole peanuts as they pose a choking hazard.  Babies lack both the teeth and the development to properly manage peanuts.
  • Once introduced, watch for 10 minutes and up to 2 hours for signs of a reaction.  In a baby, you might see: hives, cough or gasping, vomiting, you might notice they are more cuddly and needy.  If you suspect a reaction, seek immediate medical attention.
  • Once tolerated, aim for regular ingestion.  The recommended frequency is 2g of peanut protein three times a week.

 

What does 2g of peanut protein look like?

In Israel, parents feed their children a snack called Bamba – a dissolvable, airy snack that contains peanut protein.  Shaped like a Cheese Doodle, 2/3 bag of Bamba equals 2g of peanut protein.  To begin, you can crush the Bamba and mix it with water to feed.

 

spoon-of-peanut-butter-robinmcnicoll-flickr

photo by robinmcnicoll via Flickr – unaltered and posted according to Creative Commons Attribution 2.0

If you’d like to use peanut butter, 2g of peanut protein is equal to 2 tsp or 1 household spoon (as in, from your utensil drawer).  Mix SMOOTH peanut butter with hot water and COOL.  You can then mix it with fruit or vegetable puree before serving.

 

Two grams of peanut flour or protein is equal to 2 tsp.  Again, these can be mixed with fruit or vegetable purees.

 

(Peanut containing cereals were not specifically recommended because of the varying levels of peanut protein as well as sugar and sodium content by brand.)

 

A few notes: 

For those of you, like me, whose children are already allergic.  This is not instruction to begin feeding them peanuts.  DO NOT!

 

And for those of you, like me, who read these guidelines and felt guilty about eating peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding… or NOT eating peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding…  or delaying introduction (as we were instructed at that time):

 

You did not cause your child’s food allergy.  There IS no single cause of food allergies.  As Dr. Matthew Greenhawt of Children’s Hospital Colorado kindly offered, “This was nobody’s fault.  You followed the best data at the time.  Your avoidance didn’t cause [your child’s] peanut allergy.”  I’ll be honest, I welled with tears hearing this from an allergist.

 

This exciting news represents a paradigm shift in the prevention of food allergies.  Here’s hoping that future generations won’t be plagued by the same number and severity of cases!

 

Download NIAID’s full recommendation report here:  Addendum Guidelines for the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in the United States.

 

Auvi-Q’s Returning to Market With an Innovative New Approach January 23, 2017

Oh, happy day!

auvi-q-production-line

Auvi-Q is coming back to market on February 14, 2017!

As many of you already know, Auvi-Q is an innovative, FDA-approved epinephrine auto-injector that is about the size of a deck of cards.  Auvi-Q was invented by twin brothers, Eric and Evan Edwards, who suffered from severe, life-threatening food allergies as children. Eric Edwards, an MD, and Evan Edwards, an engineer, teamed up as adults to invent this unique and effective life-saving device.

 

This product has a very valuable place on the market:

  • It fits in your pocket – making a great choices for dads, preteens and teens;
  • It speaks the instructions, step-by-step – reducing the worry over training and operation;
  • Auvi-Q’s needle retracts immediately after injection, mitigating the possibility of lacerations and making it safe to handle.

 

But that’s not even the best part.  Not only are Eric and Evan patients, they’re also food allergy parents who understand the needs of our community from a unique, first-hand perspective.  After speaking to patients and considering their own family’s needs, they wanted to ensure all families had access to and could afford their product.  So they are introducing AffordAbility, a first-of-its-kind program under which the vast majority of patients (including those with high deductibles) can obtain Auvi-Q for $0.  And, not only will the product be free for so many patients, but Auvi-Q will also be available for direct-delivery to your home (in most cases, in less than 48 hours in insulated packaging).

 

The makers of Auvi-Q, kaléo Pharma, wanted to remove as many of the barriers families face in order to ensure that the patients who needed this life-saving medication would be able to obtain it.  No family should have fear they are unprepared to help in a life-or-death severe allergic reaction such as anaphylaxis.

 

The Auvi-Q website is a wealth of information: Auvi-Q.com.  Please refer to it for further questions the device, prescription, the AffordAbility program, and direct delivery service.

 

 

 

Food Allergy Podcast: Positive Parenting June 29, 2016

Filed under: Health,Technology — malawer @ 8:30 am

Last week I had the pleasure of speaking with Lyndsay Edwards of the Allergy Blog Awards UK and recording a podcast about food allergies.

 

As a fellow food allergy parent, Lyndsay herself is an award-winning blogger for Living with Cow’s Milk Protein Allergy and writes weekly for The Children’s Allergy Foundation.  Through Allergy Blog Awards UK, Lyndsay is adept at gathering useful information and recording her interviews in the form of a podcast. Her podcasts are downloadable, fun to listen to and easy to digest.

 

My podcast focuses on a topic near and dear to my heart: how to parent positively in the face of food allergies.  Food allergies are nerve wracking.  Parents have to put in extra effort to avoid transferring their anxieties to their children.  And, parents of food allergic children must focus on empowering their kids in a unique way.

 

Listen to the podcast here:

Allergy Shmallergy Living Positively with Food Allergies

4. Erin Malawer - Allergy SHMAllergy Living Positively With Food Allergies

 

Food Allergy Advancements: DBV Technologies’ Viaskin Patch June 27, 2016

Filed under: Health,Technology — malawer @ 10:37 am

1599,Viaskin-tenu-doigtsUntil recently, there was no “treatment” for those with food allergies.  We may now be on the cusp of a big breakthrough for patients with peanut and milk allergies.

 

I’ve been following all the latest buzz about Viaskin, a peanut patch developed by biopharmaceutical company DBV Technologies.  This patch aims to desensitize patients allergic to peanuts through their skin, so that the risk and reaction associated with accidental ingestion may be reduced.

 

DBV is also partnering with Nestlé Health Science in developing on a non-invasive, ready-to-use patch-test tool to diagnose milk protein allergy called MAG1C.  Between 5 and 15% of infants worldwide have a milk allergy.  But because their symptoms can sometimes be non-specific, this allergy is often difficult to diagnose.  Missed diagnoses can lead to nutritional imbalance, infant distress, and in some cases to life-threatening anaphylaxis.

To learn more about DBV’s innovative approach and more about Viaskin specifically, I interviewed Susanna Mesa, Senior Vice President of Strategy for DBV Technologies.

 

1) How did DBV decide to pursue a treatment for food allergies?

 

Dr. Pierre-Henri Benhamou, Chairman and CEO of DBV Technologies, was a pediatric gastroenterologist, and in his daily practice, he often worked with patients suffering from food allergies. As there are no approved treatments for food allergies, it was clear there was a large, unmet medical need that was not being addressed. While some traditional immunotherapy routes had been explored in the academic setting, the severe side effects associated with these other methods limited drug development in the past. Pierre-Henri envisioned developing a treatment for food allergies that was safe and efficacious, but also, that was patient-friendly and convenient. This is how the Viaskin patch was developed, with patients in mind.

 

2) What can you tell readers about the treatment itself, how does it work, what is it, etc.?

 

Viaskin is not currently approved by the regulatory agencies, and the treatment is being tested in multiple clinical trials in the U.S., Canada and Europe. The most advanced product candidate is Viaskin Peanut, which is currently being investigated in a Phase III trial in children ages 4-11 years.

 

Viaskin bridges cutting-edge technology with a scientific breakthrough. The Viaskin patch is based on Epicutaneous Immunotherapy, or EPIT, DBV’s novel immunotherapy method, which aims to desensitize food allergic patients by leveraging the skin’s immune characteristics. EPIT targets the upper layer of skin where there is a concentration of antigen presenting cells that activate the immune system without allowing passage of the allergen into the bloodstream. In clinical trials, we have observed that the absence of allergen in bloodstream allows Viaskin to desensitize patients without causing any serious adverse events.

 

Today, Viaskin is being investigated in clinical trials for peanut and milk allergies, and preclinical work for egg allergy is ongoing.

3) Do you expect to expand your technology to treat other common food allergens such as tree nuts, shellfish, soy, etc.? Is DBV tailoring their success to help food allergy patients in different countries (i.e., peanuts are some of the most dangerous in the US, but sesame is more common in Israel and buckwheat in Japan, etc.)?

 

Our mission is to offer a novel, efficacious and patient-friendly therapy to all food allergies patients. Our technology platform allows us to target many food allergies, but we try to prioritize our development by assessing which areas have the highest unmet medical need, which is why we are aiming to address peanut allergies first. However, milk allergy, for example, while it is very common in U.S. pediatric patients, is also very common in Asia and other countries. We are a global company, with headquarters in the U.S. and France, and we hope that in the future we will continue to increase our reach and presence in other countries as well.

4) How long is the average treatment period?

At this stage because we are still investigational product, we believe the duration of treatment will be based on each individual patient’s needs.

5) What is the goal for the average patient? Is it tolerance to a certain level of their allergen or are they considered to be no longer allergic?

In our ongoing clinical trials, we are evaluating patients’ desensitization over time, but our ultimate goal is to derisk patients from the life-threating reactions that put them in jeopardy —we want to get them to a level of desensitization where they will be protected from the risk associated with accidental exposure to peanut protein.

6) What is required of the average patient following treatment with a Viaskin patch? Is there any medication or maintenance involved?

 

As of today, there is no approved medication or maintenance to treat food allergies. We believe maintenance regimes will be tailored to each patient specifically by his or her physician.

7) What is the status of the three Viaskin patches? Are they available to food allergic patients?

 

The Viaskin treatment is still in the pre-approval phase, and as such is not yet available for patients. Our Viaskin Peanut patch is the most advanced and a Phase III trial is being conducted for this treatment for patients ages 4 to 11. Viaskin Milk is currently undergoing a Phase II trial, and we are still in the pre-clinical stage with our treatment for hen’s egg allergies.

8) Who is a candidate for Viaskin Peanut? Are there any age or other exclusions from effective treatment?

 

The treatment is not currently approved.

 

9) What is the benefit of using the Viaskin patch over oral immunotherapy?

 

There is currently no approved treatment for food allergies, and because of that, there haven’t been any comparative studies. But, what we want to offer patients is a convenient, safe, effective treatment, and we believe that there is a unique value in that focus that it is not currently available with other methods of immunotherapy.

10) How can someone get more information regarding using the Viaskin Patch for treatment? Where can they find doctors/clinics using this innovative technology?

 

As Viaskin is still in the pre-approval phase, the patch is not yet available for use. With respect to any ongoing and future clinical trials, trial centers that are actively enrolling patients are listed on ClinicalTrials.gov where information on the various participating centers is available, as well as on the DBV website.

 

Save