Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Auvi-Q’s Returning to Market With an Innovative New Approach January 23, 2017

Oh, happy day!

auvi-q-production-line

Auvi-Q is coming back to market on February 14, 2017!

As many of you already know, Auvi-Q is an innovative, FDA-approved epinephrine auto-injector that is about the size of a deck of cards.  Auvi-Q was invented by twin brothers, Eric and Evan Edwards, who suffered from severe, life-threatening food allergies as children. Eric Edwards, an MD, and Evan Edwards, an engineer, teamed up as adults to invent this unique and effective life-saving device.

 

This product has a very valuable place on the market:

  • It fits in your pocket – making a great choices for dads, preteens and teens;
  • It speaks the instructions, step-by-step – reducing the worry over training and operation;
  • Auvi-Q’s needle retracts immediately after injection, mitigating the possibility of lacerations and making it safe to handle.

 

But that’s not even the best part.  Not only are Eric and Evan patients, they’re also food allergy parents who understand the needs of our community from a unique, first-hand perspective.  After speaking to patients and considering their own family’s needs, they wanted to ensure all families had access to and could afford their product.  So they are introducing AffordAbility, a first-of-its-kind program under which the vast majority of patients (including those with high deductibles) can obtain Auvi-Q for $0.  And, not only will the product be free for so many patients, but Auvi-Q will also be available for direct-delivery to your home (in most cases, in less than 48 hours in insulated packaging).

 

The makers of Auvi-Q, kaléo Pharma, wanted to remove as many of the barriers families face in order to ensure that the patients who needed this life-saving medication would be able to obtain it.  No family should have fear they are unprepared to help in a life-or-death severe allergic reaction such as anaphylaxis.

 

The Auvi-Q website is a wealth of information: Auvi-Q.com.  Please refer to it for further questions the device, prescription, the AffordAbility program, and direct delivery service.

 

 

Advertisements
 

Day of the Dead Halloween Party October 25, 2016

Disclaimer: Allergy Shmallergy received these goods in exchange for an honest review.  I only feature products that I use myself and believe would be useful to the food allergy community.

2016-10-25-14-17-32

Trick or Treat banner from Oriental Trading

 

 

Halloween is almost here!  I hope you are all busy painting and decorating your teal pumpkins.  Teal pumpkins are a great way to let food allergy families know that you support them by offering non-food treats.  And by now, you all know that Oriental Trading has an enormous selection of non-food treats to fill your Halloween buckets.  These trick-or-treat items have a huge impact on kids with food allergies who often cannot collect almost any candy.  Food allergic kids can feel very left out at Halloween which is why it’s important to find ways for everyone to have fun safely.

2016-10-25-15-23-56

My middle son sporting a pair of glow in the dark vampire fangs…

[Oriental Trading supports the Teal Pumpkin project.  Check out their Halloween selection here.]

 

And, don’t forget to check their coupon page (you never know!):  Oriental Trading Coupon & Promo Page

 

We have a tradition of hosting an annual Halloween party at our house.  I began this as a way of ensuring that my son had plenty to eat and lots to celebrate when he was a young trick-or-treater.  Initially, he was allergic to so many foods that I couldn’t find a single candy he could enjoy safely.

 

I’m happy to report that he has since outgrown a few allergies.  Most candy is still off limits to him.  But surrounded by great friends at a pre-trick-or-treat dinner and post-candy-swap, he doesn’t mind.   Every year, the party grows and grows to include more families and more fun!

 

This year, I’ve create a Day of the Dead themed Halloween table.

halloween-middle-table

The playful patterns and colorful sugar skulls dress up any table.  Check out the cups!

2016-10-25-14-36-02

 

I couldn’t resist these plates and napkins – so I infused a little of the traditional Halloween with the addition of these irresistible black and white plates and napkins.

img_5807

 

Just like an outfit, accessories can make a table.  This sugar skull bowl and small skulls were a great addition to the black and whites at play.

img_5799

Are you looking at this table runner?!  You can’t quite tell from the photos, but it has spiders at the center of the webs and glitters in the light.  And, that pumpkin?!  I’ll be using it on my table through Thanksgiving!

 

 

I also picked out this silicone mold – which can be used for ice or to dress up snacks!

img_5785

 

Here’s a list of the items I used to create my Day of the Dead Halloween table:

 

Day of the Dead Candy Dish

Glittered Spider Table Runner

Foam Orange Pumpkin

Skull & Crossbones Ice Cube Tray

Skulls

“Trick or Treat” Halloween Cardboard Pennant Banner

Spider Web Dinner Plates

Large Polka Dots Dessert Plates

Boo Beverage Napkins

Day of the Dead Disposable Cups

Glow-in-the-Dark Vampire Teeth

Colorful Halloween Spider Rings

Day of the Dead Skull Wall Decoration

 

 

Now that the table – and the mood – are set, stay tuned later this week to see what I’m serving!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motivations: Food Allergy Baker, Nicole Seevers and Cole’s Moveable Feast August 29, 2016

Filed under: Holiday,Order & Ship,Parent Sanity,Uncategorized — malawer @ 3:45 am

 

My hats are off to all the parents out there who are taking time out of their lives to make life better for all of us with food allergies.

 

I’d like to introduce you to one such parent, fellow food allergy mom, Nicole Seevers of Cole’s Moveable Feast.  On a quest to ensure her son always feels included, she began experimenting in the kitchen.  The results aren’t just safe and delicious for her son, Cole; they are scrumptious for everyone!

 

We were the lucky recipients of the above OUTSTANDING allergy-friendly dessert: iced tea cupcakes with lemonade frosting – possibly my favorite flavor combination of all time. I opened the box and thought they might be almost too beautiful to eat.  Almost.  Their mouth-watering aroma sucked me in immediately.  I’m usually more of a frosting girl (and, oh my gosh, was this frosting good), but it was the moist and tasty cake that balanced the tart and sweet original frosting so well that just made the treat.  My kids loved them and my extended family had no idea they were made without wheat, dairy, peanuts or tree nuts.  I’m planning on ordering these again for my next brunch.  And my food allergic son has requested I call Nicole for his next birthday.  That’s ONE thing off my party planning list!

 

Nicole can cater to almost any allergy and any occasion.  Check out her gallery of goodies at Cole’s Moveable Feast.  And, for those outside her delivery area, please check out our ever-growing list of allergy-friendly bakeries on Allergy Shmallergy’s Allergy Friendly Bakeries page.

 

Inspired by her story and motivation, I took a moment to ask Nicole a few questions…

 

1.  Tell us about how you got into the baking business?  Were you always a baker?
Not long ago, a lot of my friends and family would have been surprised to see the word ‘baker’ connected to my name.  I grew up here in Virginia, and like most people, food was a big part of my family life.  My mom and my grandmother were wonderful cooks, and the desserts were especially good. I learned a lot from them, but it wasn’t a passion for me. I headed to New York after college and stayed there for 12 years, practicing law and eating a majority of my meals in restaurants. My husband is a great cook, but it was never really my thing.  When we did eat at home, I was usually in charge of dessert (I have a big sweet tooth). But things got more complicated when our second child was born.

 

2.  What inspired you to bake allergy-friendly goods?
My son Cole. As soon as we introduced solid food, we knew. His first taste of yogurt made him sick. He vomited and started wheezing. Eggs did the same thing. Over the course of the next few months, we learned he was allergic to dairy, eggs, tree nuts, buckwheat, sesame and shellfish. He also has asthma and spent nearly a year avoiding gluten to try to reduce inflammation. I think under normal circumstances, it could have been overwhelming, especially for someone who didn’t spend a lot of time in the kitchen. But I had watched my own mom handle it. My younger brother struggled with the same allergies and more … including wheat, soy and corn. Those are tough allergies anyway, and in the ’70s, there was no popping into Whole Foods for an allergy-free snack. But my mom rolled up her sleeves and dealt with it.

So for me, it meant figuring out how to make sure Cole didn’t feel deprived or left out. Celebrations are big in our family. I wanted to learn how to make treats we could all enjoy. And it turns out, I LOVED baking. But what about when Cole was invited to a birthday party? Or when he started school, and had to say ‘no thanks’ every time a parent brought in cupcakes for a celebration. I was spending so much money on expensive, processed snack foods that were allergy-friendly but kind of bland. I thought, I can’t be the only one who wants better options. So this spring, I launched Cole’s Moveable Feast.

 

3.  Do you cater only to the food allergic community?
At first I did, but then people started asking me to do “regular” cakes for their events also.  But I’d say 90% of what I do is customized around specific allergies. Frankly, I like some of my allergy-free goodies more than the regular kind! I probably shouldn’t admit that, huh?

 

4.  What are some of your biggest challenges in the kitchen?
Time and space! It’s me, one oven, one dishwasher and two mixers.  I have a separate pantry and fridge for bakery ingredients and dedicated cabinets for equipment. But allergy-free recipes, especially those without gluten or eggs, require additional steps and ingredients, so it takes longer and makes a bigger mess.  And I’m fastidious about sanitizing surfaces and equipment, especially between orders. That takes more time than you’d think. So I’m starting to think about next steps … my dream is a bakery where anyone can walk in and find something on the menu board. Cole has never experienced that.

 

5.  Is there any allergen/other obstacle you’ve had a hard time accommodating?  How do/did you overcome obstacles?
Oh yeah. It’s hard enough to bake without egg, dairy and gluten. In fact, I had to come up with my own gluten-free flour blends and egg substitutes, because I just couldn’t get my baked goods where I wanted them with commercially-available substitutes. But when you take soy and corn out of the equation, it gets even harder. Those ingredients are everywhere because they’re cheap (and genetically-modified and federally-subsidized, but that’s a rant for a different day). But I’ve gotten there, after lots of research and working closely with my customers … and throwing out a TON of failed experiments. I am so thankful for the Internet, for all those people that forged ahead of me and blogged about it. And for companies like Earth Balance, Authentic Foods and Enjoy Life, among others, that are dedicated to producing high-quality allergy-free ingredients.

 

6.  Has taking customized orders forged a connection to your clients?
YES! That was the biggest surprise in all of this. I figured, if I got lucky, word would get out and I’d get a nice flow of orders listing the ingredients that needed to be excluded. I didn’t realize that nearly every single order would come with a unique story. The mother that was told a party venue could handle her child’s food allergies … until they heard it was soy. The child with a severely restricted diet that hasn’t had cake in years. The adult struggling with health issues. Everyone has something they’re dealing with, but we’re wired to connect and comfort, love and celebrate, through FOOD. When I can be part of that connection, it’s  awesome. Baking for someone can be a very intimate act.

 

7.  What has been the most rewarding aspect of starting your company?
Well first and foremost, it’s that connection I was talking about. I really can’t believe I get to do this. Meet interesting people, help them out, bake and get paid for it?! It’s pushing me out of my comfort zone, forcing me to connect, solve puzzles, make mistakes, rethink. But also, my three kids are SO excited about it.  I love letting them be a part of this, letting them witness the fact that you can find what brings you joy and go after it.  My dad has always pushed me to do that: to have a vision and do the hard work to make it happen. I want my kids to learn that lesson too.

 

 

Girl Scout Cookies Allergen Reference February 24, 2016

Thanks-A-Lot Girl Scout Cookies

I remember being a Brownie.  To me, selling Girl Scout cookies was kind of intimidating.  I didn’t like going door to door and asking people to buy things.  There wasn’t any opportunity to set up a stand with friends in my town.  I might have been braver in that case:  you know, power in numbers.

 

As an adult, I want to support those adorable, little Girl Scouts who are sometimes nervous just like I was.   Which is why I hate having to say no due to food allergies issues.

 

So, I did a little research in the hopes that it helps you all make good decisions and allows you to support your local Brownies and Girl Scouts… by buying delicious cookies!  Now that I’m armed with some information, our family may try some ourselves this year!

 

Girl Scout cookies are made by one of two manufacturers:  ABC Smart Cookies or Little Brownie Bakers.  To find out which manufacturer bakes your local Girl Scout cookies, you must contact your local council:  locate your council here.

 ——————————

While Little Brownie Bakers do not list ingredients lists for their cookies on their website, their allergen statement looks thorough.  All it should take is a quick peruse of the ingredient list on the box to determine whether the box is safe for your family.  Here’s their allergen statement:

The allergen statement clearly states the top 8 allergens contained inside each package. We encourage consumers with food allergies to check the ingredient statement on each package for the most current ingredient information because product formulations can change at any time.

If the allergen in concern is not listed below the ingredient statement, we are confident that the product is safe for consumption. Please trust the labeling. We do use a may contain statement for peanuts and tree nuts when the product is produced on a line that shares equipment with another product that does contain peanuts or tree nuts. Scientific evidence has shown that consumers with peanut and tree nut allergies can have a severe reaction to amounts that are below the current detectable limits based on existing technology.

For this reason, we have chosen to warn consumers allergic to peanuts and tree nuts of the potential for extremely low levels by using a may contain statement. The equipment is thoroughly cleaned in between processes and we follow Good Manufacturing Practices in all of our facilities. Beyond the top eight allergens, all ingredients are declared within the ingredient statement. If you are concerned about a specific ingredient, please review the ingredient statement to determine if it is part of the product formulation.

 

——————————

 

ABC Smart Cookies, the Girl Scout’s other cookie manufacturer, also seems food allergy savvy.  They produce gluten-free cookies in a certified gluten-free facility and have a well-educated allergen statement which reads:

 

Over a decade ago, ABC partnered with Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN™) to learn more about life-threatening food allergies and the impact of ingredient labeling and allergen warnings. We have also worked with the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program in association with the University of Nebraska to review our sanitation, handling, and training procedures.  ABC adopted what is known as “product-specific” allergen labeling. Product-specific labeling enables the allergy-affected consumer to make an informed decision based on information specific to that particular product.

Product-specific labeling requires strict compliance to good manufacturing practices to prevent cross contamination such as:

  • Segregation of known allergens from the general production environment
  • Color-coding of storage units and utensils
  • Curtained-off production areas
  • Designated lanes for transportation of known allergens
  • Swabbing and testing of allergen shared equipment

In addition, we call out all allergens on our packaging, order cards and web site and provide specific warning if a product is made on a line that also produces product with a common allergen such as peanuts. ABC’s proactive approach to allergens is an example of our commitment to producing the best quality Girl Scout Cookies possible for the millions of valued consumers who support Girl Scouting every year.

 

 ——————————

 

A quick review of ingredients show that all of the cookies were egg-free; Thin Mints, Cranberry Citrus Crisps, Lemonades, and Thanks-a-Lots are nut-free; several were vegan and therefore dairy-free; and at least one variety was gluten-free.  Check out their sites and I think you’ll find, like I did, that Girl Scout cookies are far more food allergy-friendly than you think!  Now, get out there and say YES! to some Girl Scouts.  You’ll make their day!

 

 

Girl Scout cookies

 

 

Happy Birthday! (Peanuts, Tree nuts, Milk, Eggs, Wheat/Gluten) December 31, 2010

Today is my birthday.  And, I’ve been up for hours now baking my own allergy-free birthday cake so that my son can enjoy it with me later.  The effort is totally worth it when I see him eating the frosting (and sometimes ONLY the frosting) and then walking around the house with it smeared inexplicably in his hair and other oddball locations.  My recipe is simple and delicious.  But had I planned ahead a little, I could have ordered a cake from some amazing allergy-free bakeries and slept in!

Here are my favorites:

Divvies:  Located near my parents’ house in NY, Divvies makes allergy-free popcorn, cupcakes, amazing cookies (don’t miss the ginger molasses, even if you think you don’t like that kind) and candy.  The owners are parents of a food allergic child and are extremely conscientious of allergy-related issues.  Divvies ships and has devised a clever way to package things like cupcakes to ensure they arrive looking perfect!

www.divvies.com

————————————————————————————-

And, locally (DC Metro area):  Free For All Cupcakes makes outstanding milk, egg and nut-free cupcakes of all varieties in an allergy-free environment.   They also make gluten-free, vegan and organic cupcakes with all kinds of available frosting flavors and fun decorations.  Best of all, they are delicious and convenient!

www.freeforallcupcakes.com

Happy Birthday to me and Happy New Year to you!