Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

In-Flight Free-From Meals – Airlines Addressing Dietary Restrictions August 29, 2018

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If you’re taking to the air soon, you may be pleased to be able to request a special meal from your air carrier.  Airlines all over the world are responding to calls for special meals ranging from low-sodium and halal (made without pork or alcohol) to gluten-free.

 

Requests for special meals have increased over the years.  Historically, passengers have asked for specific meals for medical reasons or those that adhere to their belief system.  Experts wonder if the number of requests has increased because of the popularity of certain diets or the idea that special meals may be healthier or better tasting than those regularly served.  While that remains to be seen, the willingness to offer such meals is uplifting to patients with food allergies.

 

Both domestic and international travelers can take advantage of special orders covering a wide range of meal choices, but which ones your airline offers will vary from carrier to carrier, ticket type and destination.

 

Here’s a sampling of available allergy-friendly meals by airline.  As you will see, the meals Click on each airline to be directed to their site more details, including their policies on nuts and other allergens.

 

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Domestic Flights:

 

American Airlines

Glutose-Intolerant

Lactose-Intolerant

Vegan

 

Delta Airlines

Gluten-free

Vegetarian

 

United 

Vegetarian

Gluten-Intolerant

United policy for passengers with food allergies

 

 

International Carriers:

 

ANA

Allergen-Free Meals (choice between the 7 Allergen Free Meal and the 27 Allergen Free Meal)

7 Allergen Free Meal for Children

Gluten-Friendly

Low-Lactose

Seafood Meal (does not contain meat)

 

British Airways

various Vegetarian Meals

Gluten Intolerant

Low Lactose

 

JAL 

Gluten-Free

Vegetarian

Seafood Meal

Minimal Allergen Menu Meals

 

Luftansa

Gluten-Intolerant

Lactose-Intolerant

Vegan

Vegetarian

 

Malaysia Airlines

Gluten-Intolerant

Low Lactose

Vegan

various Vegetarian Meals

Seafood Meal

Special Meals

 

Qatar Airways

Gluten-Free

Non-Lactose

various Vegetarian Meals (also excludes fish, seafood, eggs and dairy)

 

Singapore Air

various Vegetarian Meals

Vegan

Gluten Intolerant

Low Lactose

Non-Strict Nut Free Meal

 

Turkish Airlines

various Vegetarian Meals (also excludes fish, seafood, eggs and dairy)

Gluten-Free

Low-Lactose

 

 

Please comment below if you’ve had one of these meals and let us know how it was!

 

Alpha-Gal Allergy and the Lone Star Tick August 6, 2018

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An unusual food allergy is on the rise across the United States.  And it could strike anyone – with or without a previous history of allergies.

 

Caused by a tick bite, this once-rare condition can cause a person to develop an allergy to red meat and, in some cases, to dairy products.

 

Interestingly, this allergy is triggered by a carbohydrate (known as the alpha-gal molecule) and not a protein like most allergic reactions.  Just as fascinating, Alpha-gal allergy is characterized by a delayed on-set of symptoms.  Unlike a traditional food allergy which usually causes a reaction very soon after eating, Alpha-gal allergic symptoms typically show themselves between 3 and 8 hours after red meat consumption.

 

Alpha-gal allergy is spread through a bite from the Lone Star tick.  The Lone Star tick can be found in wooded areas and grassy areas in the southeast, east coast and midwest of the United States as well as parts of Canada and the northern portion of South America.  It can also be caused by the European Caster Bean tick and the Paralysis tick in Australia.

 

The best way to prevent a tick bite is by using tick repellant when exploring in the woods and areas of high grass. Wear long sleeves, long pants, and high socks whenever possible on such excursions.  Check your skin and hair following an outing.  Here’s the CDC’s advice on how to properly remove a tick.

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The symptoms of alpha-gal allergic reaction vary from a runny nose, nausea and diarrhea, to hives and anaphylaxis, the most severe form of allergic reaction (review the symptoms and language of an allergic reaction).  Just as with a traditional food allergy, those with alpha-gal allergies should treat their symptoms immediately with epinephrine.

 

To review the symptoms of anaphylaxis as well as how those symptoms may be described by a child, please read The Language of a Food Allergy.

 


Comment below!

I would love to hear from those who have an alpha-gal allergy!

What has your experience been like?

What are some of the trickiest foods to avoid?

What is the most difficult part of managing this allergy?

How has this changed your perspective?

 

 

 

Visiting Amusement Parks with Food Allergies June 18, 2018

Headed to an amusement park this summer?  It’s a good time to plan your meals ahead so you don’t have a meltdown on your hands.  And, navigating an amusement park can be easy!  In fact, you may be surprised to see how many major amusement parks are well-prepared for guests with food allergies.  If you’ve recently visited an amusement park, please be sure to leave us a comment and let us know how it went!

 

Headed to an amusement park?  Consider these tips:

 

  • Pack (or ship to your hotel) snacks and hard-to-eat-safely items like breakfast, hamburger rolls, granola bars and desserts.
  • Bring a collapsible cooler (AND freezable cooler packs) to tote into the parks for the day.  They are great at storing safe food as well as keeping epinephrine auto-injectors cool during long, hot days.
  • ALWAYS carry two auto injectors.  Everyone wants to carry as little as possible to an amusement park, but two auto-injectors MUST come with you.  Consider a small backpack with a zipper so you’re not bogged down with a spillable purse or tote bag.  You’re going to need sunscreen anyway…!
  • Contact culinary services at least a week in advance to ensure you have a fun, easy and SAFE day at the park!

 

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Walt Disney World, Disney Land and Associated Properties

Disney is renowned for how it accommodates guests with food allergies.  They are truly the gold standard.  Guests can review menus and have access to chefs to obtain further information.  It is recommended that you discuss your food allergies with each server, as always.  There’s lots of excellent information and suggestions online, including contacting them prior to your trip should you have 4 or more allergens and how to bring safe food into the parks.

Disney Special Dietary Requests

 

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Universal

Universal Orlando recommends prepping for your trip by reviewing menus and discussing your allergies with a Guest Services advisor.  Plus, they outline how to bring your own food into the park should you need to!

If you’re headed to Universal Studios Hollywood, you’re in luck:  you can easily view what’s safe online.  Call Guest Services if you have multiple food allergies or further questions.

Universal Orlando Food Allergy info

Universal Studios Hollywood Dining Food Guide

 

Legoland

Legoland refers guests with food allergies to a Dietary Guide that doesn’t connect at the present moment.  They also suggest contacting  LLF-Food@legoland.com prior to your visit to answer specific questions.  Per their guidelines, outside food and drinks may be brought into the park for dietary needs.

Legoland Florida – Food Allergies

Outside Food and Alcohol Policy

 

 

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Seaworld

Did you know that Seaworld has designated dining facilities for visitors with food allergies?  There is at least one restaurant in each of their parks that is best suited to handle food allergy issues and preparation.  Click each link to read more about Seaworld’s food allergy preparations and policies.

Seaworld Orlando Food Allergy Info

Seaworld San Diego Food Allergy Info

Seaworld San Antonio Food Allergy Info

 

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Hershey Park

In addition to making allergen menus available at most of Hershey Park’s restaurants, dining for those with food allergies has just gotten easier with the addition of a gluten-free, nut-free, fish and shellfish-free restaurant.  Hershey notes that every nursing station is equipped with EpiPens, but – as always – remember to bring your own.

Hershey Park Food Allergen Information

Hershey Park Food Allergen Information

 

Sesame Place

Sesame Place keeps its allergen information to individualized questions.  They ask that guests ask specific questions to  AllergenfriendlySPL@sesameplace.com at least 3-5 business days in advance for additional information. A culinary representative will work with each guest to ensure a safe dining experience.  Guests with food allergies are allowed to bring in safe food.

Sesame Place Food Allergen Information

 

 

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Six Flags

Six Flags have a variety of restaurants at each park.  While you cannot see an allergen menu on their site, you may be able to get the name of food vendors and research ingredients that way (for example, Six Flags Great Adventure has a Panda Express that a visitor could research).  Should you have food allergies, you can bring food inside the park.  If you plan on eating at one of the parks’ restaurants, be sure to ask LOTS of questions about ingredients and prep including french fry oil and cross contamination.

Six Flags

 

Busch Gardens

Busch Gardens seems to take food allergies seriously.  They answers a lot of excellent questions right on their website and provide ways of obtaining even more specific information should it be needed. Busch Gardens Tampa even offers allergen friendly dining facilities.  Again, collapsible coolers are allowed for those with dietary restrictions.

Busch Gardens Tampa Food Allergen Info

Busch Gardens Williamsburg Food Allergen Info

 

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Cedar Point

Cedar Point’s website identifies dining locations that serve certain allergens as well as a few that do not serve certain allergens.  If you have multiple food allergies, this may take a little cross referencing to find a few things that are safe.  They do not list information about brining in safe food from outside – so you may have to contact them directly.

Cedar Point Special Dietary Needs

 

Knott’s Berry Farm

Knott’s Berry Farms follows the same process as Cedar Point in identifying products and locations that use allergens.  They also identify certain locations and products that are free from specific allergens.  Again, they do not list if you can bring in safe food from outside the park. Contact them directly should you need additional information.

Knott’s Berry Farm Dietary Needs

 

Canada’s Wonderland

Once again, Canada’s Wonderland follows the same process as Cedar Point and Knott’s Berry Farm in helping guests navigate the park.  They list dining options by allergen, so if you have multiple food allergies, expect to cross reference these lists.  They do not state whether or not you can bring in safe food from outside of the park.  Contact them directly with additional questions.

Canada’s Wonderland Dietary Needs

 

 

 

What is Lupin Allergy and Why You Should Care June 26, 2017

Lupin allergy is on the rise.  But most people haven’t even heard of lupin in the first place.    Travelers to Europe, Australia, Canada, the Mediterranean and even the U.S. should become familiar with it.  So should those who are gluten-free as well as those who have a peanut or soy allergy.

 

Read the article I recently wrote for the Allergy & Asthma Network, entitled “Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?” to find out what lupin is, where it is found and who is most at risk for a reaction.

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Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?
from the Allergy & Asthma Network dated June 14, 2017

 

Have you heard of lupin? Don’t feel bad; most Americans haven’t heard of it either. But that’s likely to change.

 

What is lupin?

Lupin (or lupine) beans are legumes – putting them in the same plant family as the peanut. Lupin beans are high in antioxidants, dietary fiber and protein and low in starch. And like all legumes, they are gluten-free.

Lupin beans are commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine. Sometimes ground into flour and blended into regular wheat flour, lupin is also widely used in Europe and Australia. There, lupin is frequently found in baked goods and pastas as well as breads, sauces, beverages (such as beer) and meat-based products like sausage and hamburgers.

Lupin is showing up in the United States as well. It appears most often as a substitute for gluten or soy in free-from products as well as replacement for genetically modified ingredients and animal proteins (primarily dairy and egg).

 

Can you be allergic to lupin?

Although not one of the “Top 8” allergens, lupin is beginning to make headlines in the food allergy world. For many, eating products containing lupin is completely safe. However, for a few, lupin can trigger an allergic reaction. The odds of having a reaction are higher if you already have a peanut allergy. This is called cross-sensitivity.

There is no evidence that lupin allergy is more severe than other allergens. Like all allergic reactions, symptoms vary. Those who are allergic to lupin have reported reactions ranging from hives, swelling of the lips and face, to gastrointestinal and respiratory distress, and cardiovascular issues.

 

Do manufacturers label for lupin?

Due to the frequent use of lupin in European and Australian packaged goods, coupled with reports of allergic reaction, manufacturers in the European Union are required to label for lupin. But this requirement is voluntary in places like the United States, Canada, Australia and other parts of the world where you may find lupin listed among other ingredients without special emphasis. U.S. laws and regulations only require labeling to highlight the Top 8 allergens.

Those allergic to lupin or unsure should be careful of unlabeled, over-the-counter baked goods like pastries sold at a bakery, bread rolls served at a restaurant or beer at a local pub.

 

Other names for lupin are:

  • Lupin Bean/Flour
  • Lupine Bean/Flour
  • Lupin Seed
  • Lupini
  • Termes
  • Altramuz
  • Tarwi
  • Termos

While lupin is currently popular in Europe, its presence is increasing in the United States and elsewhere. As the demand for gluten-free and other free-from goods grows, so may the use of lupin.

If you are concerned you may be allergic to lupin, speak to your board-certified allergist to discuss level of risk, testing and prevention strategies. Avoiding the allergen is the only way to prevent an allergic reaction.

 

 

 

 

6 Tips for Traveling with Food Allergies March 7, 2017

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Spring break is on the horizon!  Can you smell the fresh air already?  Are you mentally packing your bags? (I am!)

 

Here are a few tips when traveling with food allergies:

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  1.  Call your airline and inquire about their food allergy policy in advance.  Ask specifically about early boarding and in-flight announcements.
  2. Most airlines will allow passengers to board the plane early in order to wipe down surfaces (this includes seat backs, seat belts, tray tables and knobs, armrests). Be sure to bring enough baby wipes or antibacterial wipes (such as Wet Ones) to cover all the legs of your travel.  Again, ask about pre-boarding at the gate.
  3. Carry your epinephrine auto-injectors and antihistamines ON BOARD.  Do not pack these away in your luggage.  [*ALLERGY SHMALLERGY TIP*: Zyrtec makes dissolvable tablets which eliminate the worry over bringing liquids through security as well as anything spilling in your bags.]
  4. If you’re traveling to a warm weather destination, you’ll need to remember to keep your epinephrine auto-injectors at room temperature – even while enjoying the beach or pool.  Pack a cool pack (like this one) and an insulated bag (like this cute lunch bag).  Store the cool packs in your hotel’s mini-fridge (who needs a $15 bag of M&Ms anyway!?) or plan on ordering a to-go cup of ice to keep the medicine cool poolside.
  5. A hotel or resort’s food services manager can usually help you navigate menus.  On our last vacation, the food services manager had food allergies himself and was invaluable in hunting down ingredients and safe alternatives for our family.  Befriend this fantastic person!
  6. If you’re planning on visiting an amusement park, taking a hike or being similarly active, consider packing a backpack into your luggage (or use one as your carry-on!).  You’ll need to bring your epinephrine auto-injectors wherever you go – especially on vacation when you’re away from home cooking, familiar restaurants and local knowledge of hospitals and doctors.  Backpacks can make carrying it easier depending on the activity – simply slip the insulated bag into your backpack and go!

 

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Two more notes:

  • Airline travelers should bring their own snacks/meals on board flights to ensure their safety.
  • Refrain from using airplane blankets and pillows as allergen residue may reside there.
  • Bring a baby or antibacterial wipe to the bathroom to wipe down door  and knob handles.

 

 

 

Summer Chic and Simple Food Allergy Solutions July 22, 2016

Filed under: Parent Sanity,Preparedness,Travel — malawer @ 4:39 pm

It’s hot out there! And, as you know, carrying epinephrine is tricky in warm weather. Here’s how I’m carrying my son’s epinephrine autoinjectors these days.

 

Because the heat is intense these days, be sure to pack your epinephrine in some kind of cooler when you’re outside. Ideally, epinephrine should be stored at 77 degrees F. (25° Celsius). But while you’re out and about, manufacturers recommend that epinephrine be kept between 59° and 86°F.

 

I recently found this cute, envelope shaped cooler bag in our local supermarket for under $5.   It’s stylish on its own (like a clutch!) and fits nicely in both my purse and pool bag.  A similar style can be found here:  Igloo Lunch Clutch.

I stick a lunch box sized cooler pack in the insulated cooler bag, throw in my Emergency On-The-Go Pack already stocked with my son’s autoinjectors (or wrap them in a kitchen towel) to keep them right around room temperature.  Sometimes, I’ll throw in a juice box (someone always wants one anyway) to create a buffer between the cooler pack and epinephrine.

 

Stylish AND safe!

Igloo Clutch with my Emergency On-The-Go Pack

 

Everything fits perfectly!

 

Save

 

Play Ball! March 30, 2016

I love seeing more and more stadiums adopting the peanut-free game concept.

 

Lucky for us in DC, the Washington Nationals just released their peanut-free game schedule.

Sat. April 23 at 1:05 vs. Twins

Sun.  May 15 at 1:35pm  vs. Marlins

Sat. June 11 at 12:05pm vs. Phillies

Fri.  July 1st at 6:05pm vs. Reds

Sun, Aug. 14 at 1:35pm vs. Braves

Sat. Sept. 10 at 7:05pm vs. Phillies

 

Call or contact the stadium directly for ticket pricing and further information.

 

Not a Nats fan?!  (What’s wrong with you?!  Just kidding.)  Check your local team’s website for their own schedule of peanut-free games.  Don’t forget minor league teams who are awesome about getting in on the action and making baseball fun and safe for everyone.

 

UPDATE:

Rejoice, Seattle fans!  I just heard from the Mariners!

For the past several years, we’ve been offering the opportunity for fans with peanut allergies to come to games at Safeco Field and sit in sections with a reduced risk of exposure to peanuts.  Information about the games, the precautions we take and a special ticket offer is all available at Mariners.com/NoPeanuts.

 

“Take me out to the ballgame.  Take me out to the crowd! Buy me some pretzels and cold snow cones…”