Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

React? Act! April 25, 2012

Like a lot of people these days, my kids are sneezing up a storm from spring airborne allergies.  And, for my older son:  this often means an increase in his asthma.  As if the sniffling wasn’t bad enough!

 

After his first spring asthmatic reaction in school (a doozy – the kind that he hasn’t had in a long time!), we had a chat.  Knowing my son and his proclivity for following classroom rules,  I assumed correctly that my son was trying to wait until his lesson was over to let his teacher know he was wheezing.  That won’t do!  Not only is wheezing the first symptom of asthma, but can also be a symptom for a food allergy reaction.  We had to re-emphasize the importance of reporting to adults even if it means interrupting them or demanding their attention.

 

My husband and I told him that one of the FEW exceptions to following the school and classroom rules is when you don’t feel well. “If you are wheezing, you need to tell the teacher right away – even if she’s talking or teaching the class.  If you are at recess, find an adult in charge and tell THEM right away.”  We very calmly expanded the lesson to include food allergy symptoms, “If your belly feels sick, if you have hives or an itchy throat, you must also tell an adult right away.  Even if those feelings aren’t really bothering you yet. It’s important to let the nurse see what’s going on so you can get back to playing!”

 

Thankfully, my son digested this lesson very well.  Since this chat, he’s been speaking up and heading to the nurse to get a puff of his inhaler as needed.  Not only does it empower him, but it helps keep his wheezing from escalating to a full-blown asthma attack.

 

Our hope is that calmly and gently teaching kids to recognize signs of asthma and allergic reactions will make them feel in control and ultimately help protect them.

Advertisements
 

Helpful Smartphone Apps I Hope You Never Have to Use January 27, 2011

I just read about a few new smartphone apps that are worth it for every parent to download.  Those of us with food allergic children simply have an extra reason.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 

The first is iTriage.  Performing on the Android and iPhone platforms, iTriage houses a comprehensive list of emergency rooms, hospitals and urgent care facilities – listing their distance from your current location, their address, phone numbers, directions, ratings and wait times.  Because it pulls them up based on your location – wherever that may be, this app is essential when you travel.  iTriage also helps users make informed health decisions offering information about symptoms, medical procedures, and even helps you locate a doctor.  This app is user-friendly and has a voice-input option to get you the information quickly.

 

http://www.itriagehealth.com/

iTriage Home Menu

 

Operating for iPhone only is the findER app.  Like iTriage, findER uses the phone’s GPS to search for and list the nearest emergency rooms and/or emergency departments (displayed either in map or list format).  With one-click, a user can obtain directions and with another click will be directed to the web to obtain more information about the medical facility.


http://itunes.apple.com/app/emnet-finder/id376928203?mt=8

findER Home Menu

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I hope no one ever has to use these apps.  But if you do, you’ll be glad you had them handy!

Pass it on!

 

Familiarize or Refamiliarize Yourself With How to Use an EpiPen January 18, 2011

Those of us who have a child at risk – or are ourselves at risk – of anaphylaxis because of an allergy are already familiar with EpiPens.  Most of us were prescribed the EpiPens and given a cursory tutorial on how to use them in a doctor’s office and left to hope we remember it all if the worst should occur.

 

Now’s a great time to reacquaint yourself with how to correctly use an EpiPen.   It’s also a great time to forward this link to family and other caretakers who may not have such allergies, so they can be prepared in case of an accident.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgvnt8YA7r8

 

 

I hope you never have to use an EpiPen.   But now you’re sure to employ it properly if you do.