Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Lift Lines and EpiPens: Skiing with Food Allergies February 8, 2016

As I look out my window, I’m surprised to see green again. Grass is finally peeking through after we received nearly 30 inches of snow.  Even after all that shoveling, all I wish for is that powdery white.  When February hits, all I want to do is ski.  Maybe it’s a holdover from my childhood when we used to get a mid-winter February break – a kind of Pavlovian yearning to be cruising down the slopes this month. Either way, when I see snowflakes, I think trails.
When my food allergic son was old enough, my husband (an avid skier) was ready to enroll him in ski school.  But the idea of trying to manage food issues on a ski vacation seemed challenging.  For one, ski lodges never seem that organized.  I couldn’t imagine who I might track down to get ingredient information on their chicken nuggets, for example – especially at mid-mountain or higher.  Secondly, there’s SO MUCH gear, etc to bring to the slopes, how was I going to carry (and where could I store and easily access) snacks and lunch for him if we brought some from home?  Finally, could I reasonably rely on the ski school to look out for him at lunch vis-à-vis his food allergies?

Well, fast forward almost 8 years, and I can happily tell you that we’ve had a lot of success on the slopes.  Here are some tips I’ve learned over the past few years:

1. Call ahead – way ahead.  Ski lodges are not nearly as disorganized as I had thought.  They’re just a lot more relaxed.  But they take food safety seriously. Be prepared to leave a message and have someone get back to you.  There is typically a food services manager who is knowledgeable about the suppliers and who can track down ingredients for you.  Be sure to ask where kids in ski school usually eat and what kinds of food they receive (are they given snacks, do they have free range on the cafeteria line, etc).

2. Bring your epinephrine autoinjector and show up for ski school EARLY.  Meet with your child’s ski instructor – teach them how to use the autoinjector and WHEN.  Remind them that they will need to store it in an inside pocket of their ski jacket to keep it close to room temperature.

3. Find out where and when your child will be having lunch and consider meeting them to help them navigate the cafeteria line.  But DON’T expect to eat with them!  Skiing creates fast friendships and they’ll have more fun hanging out with their ski buddies – go have a lunchtime date instead!

4.  Pack some safe snacks and store them in your ski locker, car or somewhere else that is readily accessible.  Kids are STARVING when they get off the slopes and cafeterias typically close right when the lifts do.

 

Now we just need some snow!  Happy trails in the meantime!

 

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Seeking All Allergy-Friendly Bakeries July 9, 2015

Baked goods that are dairy, egg, wheat or nut-free are hard to come by.  They’re even harder to come by should you want or need something custom, like a birthday cake.

That’s where our Allergy-Friendly Bakeries List comes in handy!

Do you know of a great allergy-friendly bakery?  Send us the info!

We’re compiling a list of allergy-friendly bakeries across the US, Canada, and beyond.  **Please be sure to do your own research before ordering to ensure the products are safe for you as individual’s allergies and requirements differ.**

Feel free to comment below with your information or send the details to me at erin@allergystrong.com.

Also:  Live in or near Washington?  Check out the post Allergy-Friendly Bakeries in the DC Metro Area.

 

Off-the-Shelf School Safe Treats (Nut-Free!) April 13, 2012

While at the zoo the other day, my friend whipped out these individually-wrapped treats for our boys.  My youngest son (not allergic, but still a picky palette) wolfed it down in less than 3 bites.  To say he liked them seemed like an understatement.  Better yet, it turns out that these treats were purchased from our local Whole Foods!  How could I have missed them before.

 

Treasure Mills School Safe Products are 100% tree nut and peanut-free.  And, as implied in the name, they are perfect for classroom parties, school/camp snacks, playdates, etc.  They appear to make many products from breads to cookies to brownies to mini-cakes.  And that’s not all!  Treasure Mills lists the safety of their foods against sesame seed, wheat, dairy, egg, soy, sulfite, fish/shellfish allergies as well as which products are reduced fat, sugar free and trans-fat free.

 

Treasure Mills products can be found in a number of stores including Walmart, Whole Foods, and Costco (in Canada).  I’ll be on the hunt for these tomorrow!

 

Buy Me Some Popcorn and Cracker Jacks? Peanut-Free Baseball Begins! March 19, 2012

According to Reuters, roughly half the MLB plays host to peanut-free sections throughout their seasons.  For those who are severely allergic to peanuts, the idea of sitting next to someone unshelling peanuts seems daunting.  Although the risk of a reaction at an outdoor venue is very small, according to Dr. Wood (see http://nyti.ms/aFiHNY), these special accommodations offer enormous peace of mind at a traditionally peanut-full sporting event.

  

Many teams now offer peanut-free sections, including the Milwaukee Brewers, Seattle Mariners, Minnesota Twins, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox, San Diego Padres, Toronto Blue Jays and New York Mets among many others.  And, don’t forget about the minor league teams joining the peanut-free trend!

 

As for our local team, the Washington Nationals will host peanut-free sections during certain games in June, July and August games.  These typically sell-out quickly, so be on the look-out for peanut free game announcements!  Baseball season kicks off March 28th.

 
 
 
 
For details, check out:  Peanut-Free Sections In Baseball Stadiums Welcomes Allergic Fans