Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Prep Your Meds for School: Refill Options July 28, 2017

Time to get your emergency medications ready for school.  Don’t worry:  there’s still lots of summer fun to be had!  But to maximize summer fun over back-to-school frenzy, there are a few things you can do.

img_5770

  1. Check the Date:  Check the expiration dates on your epinephrine auto-injectors.  If they are due to expire between now and December, it may be a good time to consider refilling your prescription.
  2. Know Your Options:
    • There are several choices of epinephrine auto-injectors these days and they all efficiently deliver the same life-saving drug (epinephrine) in different ways.  I’ll outline those different auto-injectors below.
    • Talk to your doctor and consider your lifestyle when choosing your auto-injector.
    • Be sure you, your school nurse, caretaker, and child are all familiar with how to operate the auto-injector(s) you choose to stock at home, school and elsewhere.
  3. Update Your Emergency Action Plan:  Your doctor may have provided you with one or you can take Allergy Shmallergy’s Emergency Action Plan to your doctor on your next appointment.  Make a copy for home, your car, on-the-go, and school.
  4. Ask Directly:  You may need to ask your doctor specifically for the auto-injector you wish to use.  Some doctors prescribe only one without discussion, but are certainly willing to write a prescription for the auto-injector that works best for you.

 

What ARE the options for epinephrine auto-injector:

img_3973

Auvi-Q:

Yes, it’s back on the market and better than ever.  Auvi-Q delivers epinephrine via a compact package that speaks to you.  You heard that right: it talks you through an injection, even counting down the length of time you are supposed to hold the device in place.  Plus, the needle automatically retracts, reducing the possibility of post-injection injury.  Each Auvi-Q is about the size of a deck of playing cards, easy to carry for everyone (especially teens, young adults and fathers – who can fit them in their pockets).

 

*Auvi-Q automatically ships and delivers their auto-injectors directly to you.  Initiate this process with your doctor.  To read more about their direct delivery service as well as their cost-coverage programs, refer to the Affordability program page.

 

img_4709

Adrenaclick:

Adrenaclick has a slimmer profile than the well-know EpiPen, but is about the same length. Adrenaclick is a no frills epinephrine auto-injector, often used as a generic for EpiPen.  In fact, responding to the rising costs of brand name epinephrine auto-injectors, CVS pharmacies (among others) replaced its stock of auto-injectors with Adrenaclick. In their words, “Patients can now purchase the authorized generic for Adrenaclick®… This authorized generic is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved device with the same active ingredient as other epinephrine auto-injector devices.”

 

*IMPORTANT, Adrenaclick operates differently than EpiPens and they DO NOT come with a trainer.  If you choose to use this useful auto-injector, be sure to also place an order for an Andrenaclick trainer.  And, do your research for best pricing locally.

 

EpiPen:

EpiPens are the most widely used and most familiar of the epinephrine auto-injectors.  In fact, its familiarity is what keeps many customers coming back.  School nurses and even non-allergic individuals may be more accustomed to its look and how to use it.  In addition, EpiPens are substantial – making them easy to find in a backpack or purse.  In 2016 Mylan, the manufacturers of EpiPen, released a generic of its own product in response to public pressure over its pricing.  Both products contain the same medication and use the same or similar injector mechanisms.  EpiPen’s price has not been reduced in any way and is the most expensive auto-injector on the market.  The generic version is less expensive, but still a price worth considering for many.

*Mylan does offer coupons which can be found on their website.

Advertisements
 

Help Fund a Cure for Food Allergies January 10, 2017

boy-1636731_1280-pixabay

“Why can’t I just be like everyone else?”

If you have a child with food allergies, you’ve likely heard this heartbreaking sentiment from your kid.  We’ve all had to console this same child who just wants to put aside his/her food allergies and anxieties even if only for a single day.

Parents would go to any length for the sake of their kids.  Food allergy parents often do by preparing safe food, educating others, strategizing for school, holidays, play dates, and celebrations.

 

But how many of us have done 3,000 burpees for them?

 

That’s what fellow food allergy parent, Mike Monroe, plans to do on January 25th in order to raise money for ongoing research for a cure for food allergies.  Mike’s goal is to raise $50,000 to support cutting-edge research examining novel applications of cellular therapy for the millions of kids with food allergies being explored at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

 

marines_burpee-us-embassy-tokyo-flickr

marines_burpee by U.S. Embassy Tokyo via Flickr

 

What’s a burpee, you might ask?  It’s a combination of push-up/plank, squat and jump performed in combination.  Try one right now!  Do another.  I think you’ll agree: it’s NOT easy!  Mike plans to complete 3,000 of these in under 12 hours.

What can you do to support Mike?

 

1.  Watch this video about Mike’s incredible motivation – his son, Miles:

 

 

2.  Consider a donation:  Every little bit helps get us all closer to a cure for food allergies.

3K Burpee Challenge for Food Allergies

3.  Share this post!  Please share this with your family and friends, share via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media channels.  Let’s support Mike and researchers to help our own kids and the millions who face life threatening food allergies every day!

 

 

Donate:

http://childrensnational.donordrive.com/campaign/BurpeeProject

Blog:

http://www.3kburpeechallenge.com/

Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/3KBurpeeChallenge/

YouTube Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSVGTkFtnyk&feature=youtu.be

 

Stay Healthy This Winter – Flu Vaccine For the Severely Egg Allergic October 23, 2013

Filed under: Health — malawer @ 9:32 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Flu - Allergy

Here’s some good news for everyone.  Researchers have come up with Flublock which uses recombinant DNA technology to prevent the flu.  Now available and approved for adults ages 18-49.

 

This is great news for those who are severely allergic to eggs!  Instead of using traditional vaccine components including egg, it uses an insect virus to help protect us from the dreaded flu.  Not only is it safe for those with an egg allergy, but it also protects those vaccinated against all strains of the flu and represents an advancement in the vaccine manufacturing process.

 

So, don’t cringe too much when you’re headed for your shot.  Relish in your good health and remember that you’re a part of the future of medicine!

 

And, if you’re looking to vaccinate those allergic to egg UNDER the age of 18, there’s more good news.  The CDC – endorsed by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology ( ACAAI) and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology – just recently updated their recommendations regarding flue vaccines for the egg allergic.  The October 2012 edition of the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology stated that special precautions (such as receiving the vaccine under a doctor’s care and remaining under observation for 30 minutes following the vaccine) are likely not necessary.

 

In emphasizing that the benefits of the flu vaccine outweigh the risk, allergist Dr. John Kelso, of the ACAAI, said, “In a large number of research studies published over the last several years, thousands of egg allergic children, including those with a severe life-threatening reaction to eating eggs, have received injectable influenza vaccine (IIV) as a single dose without a reaction. ”

 

**As always, contact your allergist with any concerns and for guidance specific to your individual healthy history.**

 

Helpful Smartphone Apps I Hope You Never Have to Use January 27, 2011

I just read about a few new smartphone apps that are worth it for every parent to download.  Those of us with food allergic children simply have an extra reason.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

 

The first is iTriage.  Performing on the Android and iPhone platforms, iTriage houses a comprehensive list of emergency rooms, hospitals and urgent care facilities – listing their distance from your current location, their address, phone numbers, directions, ratings and wait times.  Because it pulls them up based on your location – wherever that may be, this app is essential when you travel.  iTriage also helps users make informed health decisions offering information about symptoms, medical procedures, and even helps you locate a doctor.  This app is user-friendly and has a voice-input option to get you the information quickly.

 

http://www.itriagehealth.com/

iTriage Home Menu

 

Operating for iPhone only is the findER app.  Like iTriage, findER uses the phone’s GPS to search for and list the nearest emergency rooms and/or emergency departments (displayed either in map or list format).  With one-click, a user can obtain directions and with another click will be directed to the web to obtain more information about the medical facility.


http://itunes.apple.com/app/emnet-finder/id376928203?mt=8

findER Home Menu

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I hope no one ever has to use these apps.  But if you do, you’ll be glad you had them handy!

Pass it on!