Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Okay, I Give… What is Aquafaba? October 24, 2016

Filed under: Grocery and Supermarkets — malawer @ 10:43 am
Tags: , ,

chickpeas-1218368_1920

I keep hearing about this wünder-ingredient called aquafaba.  Aquafaba is showing up everywhere these days from cooking shows to fitness magazines.  People are obsessing over it.  It’s clearly the hot new thing, the ingredient du moment … which admittedly made me want to ignore it for a little while.

 

But after all of this exposure, I’ve been worn down!  I give… What is aquafaba?

 

Aquafaba is the thick liquid that forms as a result of soaking or cooking legumes (such as beans) for a while.  You know the viscous liquid you find in canned chickpeas?  That’s aquafaba!  And to think most of us have probably just poured it right down the drain.

 

As it turns out, aquafaba is one of the best egg substitutes, swapping for eggs in everything from meringues and mayonnaise to waffles, cappuccinos and cocktails.

meringue

 

How do you use it?

If the aquafaba is already fairly thick, you can begin using it right from the can.  Otherwise, you may wish to reduce the water to thicken the liquid on the stove (by no more than 25%).

Substitute Amounts:

1 Tablespoon aquafaba = 1 egg yolk
2 Tbsp aquafaba = 1 egg white
3 Tbsp aquafaba = 1 whole egg

 

I finally understand why aquafaba is blowing up in vegan circles.  It will be fabulous as a substitute for those allergic to eggs.  Start playing with it and send me your best concoctions!  I can’t wait to hear how it’s being used!

 

Now, I’m off to make chocolate chip cookies – egg-free!  (And, I may or may not be eating the dough with a spoon…it IS worry-free, afterall!)

cookie-dough-1449454_1920

 

 

Allergy-Friendly Bakeries in the Metro DC Area May 31, 2016

Read below for our continually updated list of allergy-friendly bakeries in the DC metro area.

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With all the end-of-school, summer birthday, last sports game, graduation parties to be had, there’s no time to bake your own free-from desserts.  Let’s support these fabulous businesses who are trying to make life a little easier for families living with food allergies.

 

When you’re looking to buy baked goods for someone with food allergies, it’s feels almost impossible to find a safe option.  Here’s a list of some Nut-free, Gluten-free, and/or Vegan (read: Dairy and Egg-free) bakeries in the DC metro area to satisfy your sweet tooth.  (I’m salivating as I research these great places and now dying to go to each and every one!)

 

Cole’s Moveable Feast Picture
http://www.colesmoveablefeast.com/
Led by a former attorney turned home baker, Cole’s Moveable Feast serves the Northern Virginia area.  They offer custom cakes, cupcakes, cookies, seasonal breads, pastries, and pies baked to order without dairy, egg, nuts, gluten and/or any other allergens you specify.  Using custom gluten-free flour lends and egg substitutes, their biggest sellers are cakes and cupcakes made without gluten, nuts, dairy or egg, but they can accommodate nearly any allergen (including soy and corn).   NOTE:  they even have a weekly snack delivery option!
Free from:  Nuts, gluten, dairy, egg; can customize to exclude other allergens.
Phone/online orders only.

 

Baked by Yael
https://bakedbyyael.com/
A tree nut-free and peanut-free bakery in D.C.  Among their many products, they offer gluten-free chocolate cakepops as well as dairy-free gingersnaps and egg-free raspberry bars.  A great stop after a day at the National Zoo.
Free from: Tree nuts, Peanuts.  Some goods: Dairy, Egg, Gluten.

 
Dog Tag Bakery
dogtagbakery.com
A nut-free bakery and cafe with a mission to support veterans.  They serve everything from egg and cheese sandwiches to muffins, croissants, quick breads and desserts.
Located in Georgetown.
Free from: Nuts
 
 
 
Happy Tart BakeryÉclair
happytartbakery.com
We are a 100% gluten free French patisserie!  We do bread, cupcakes, tarts and other wondrous goodies! 
Located in Del Ray, Alexandria.
Free from: Gluten, Dairy, Egg, Soy, Nuts
 
 

Out of the Bubble Bakery
www.obubblebakery.com
Based in VA
We specialize in cakes, cupcakes, and cookies for those with food restrictions.
Phone/online orders only.
Free from: Dairy, Nuts, Eggs, Soy, Dye, Gluten and made without GMOs.  Vegan and organic.

Sweet Serenity Bakery
www.sweetserenitybakery.com
Based in VA
Every ingredient is meticulously checked and manufacturers are contacted for anything questionable.  We also do not use any artificial flavorings, preservatives, hydrogenated oils, or high fructose corn syrup.
Phone/online orders only.
Free from:  Eggs, Peanuts, and Tree Nuts

 
 
 

Cookies/Scooby.jpgThe Lemonade Bakery
A dedicated Egg-free, Peanut-free, and Tree Nut-free bakery.
Delivery of cakes, cupcakes, cookies, scones, and breads to the metro-DC area.
Phone/online orders only. Delivery optional.

 
 
 
Egg-Free, Dairy-Free, and Nut-free bakery  and can also make Gluten-free, Vegan, or Custom Allergy-free cupcakes.
See Allergy Shmallergy’s Happy Birthday post from December 2010.
Phone/online orders only.
 
 
   
  
 
  
 
 
 
 

Hello Cupcake in Dupont and Capital Hill, although not a nut-free facility, offers Gluten-Free and Vegan options.

1361 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Just south of Dupont Circle, across from the Metro

705 8th Street, SE
Washington, DC 20003
3 blocks south of Eastern Market Metro

 
  
 
 
 
 

Fancy Cakes by Leslie, in Bethesda, offers some Gluten-free selections including cupcakes, cookies, and marzipan.

4939 Elm Street
Bethesda, MD  20814

  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

 Sweetz Bakery, located in a kiosk at the Dulles Town Center mall (near the food court), is a custom bakery that makes Gluten and Dairy-free cakes as well as Vegan flavors.

Dulles Town Center Mall

21100 Dulles Town Center Circle

Sterling, VA 20165

 
 
  
 
   
  
   
 
 
  
 
 

Sticky Fingers

An award-winning Vegan Bakery, also available at many retail locations including select Whole Foods in the mid-Atlantic and DC-metro area.  Everything they make is Dairy and Egg-free, and they also offer a few Nut-free and Gluten-free desserts (but are not a nut and wheat-free facility).

1370 Park Rd NW

Washington, DC  20010

   
  
 
 
 
 
 

 Sweet and Natural

An all-Vegan restaurant, also offers a selection of Vegan desserts – some of which are also available in local health food stores.

4009 34th St
Mt Rainier, MD 20712

 
 
  
 
 

Cake Love

Offers Vegan and Gluten-Free products.

Locations throughout the metro DC area including:

DC; Arlington, Tysons Corner, & Fairfax, VA;

Silver Spring, National Harbor, MD

  
 
 
 
  
 
  
 

Dama Bakery

Serves Ethiopian and French pastries in Vegan and Gluten-free varieties.

1505 Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA

  
 
 
 
  
 
 

 

Whole Foods sells “Safe For School” Nut-free cookies in their bakery section.

  
 
  
 
 
 
  

The Westbard Giant in Bethesda sells Nut-free cupcakes. According to one shopper, you can usually find them in the freezer located in the bakery (not the regular freezer section), but they are sometimes displayed in the bakery section. They carry a label stating that they were made in a nut free facility.  Convenient!

  
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 

 For even more Vegan bakeries located in and around DC, check out the list at VegDC.com and Urbanspoon.com.

 

‘Tis the Season: 504 Plans April 15, 2016

 

Fall and the start of school seem far away – I mean, who can think about going back to school when summer is just around the corner?!  That said, many of you are now sitting in front of a pile of forms thinking about 504 Plans for your children for next fall.

 

504 refer to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.  These plans are set in place to provide accommodations to school age children with disabilities (food allergies are listed among the qualifiers) to ensure that they are afforded equal access to learning and academic success as their peers.

 

These plans are created in collaboration with your child’s school and spell out food allergy management.  In addition to a Food Allergy Action Plan, 504 Plans can cover a broad range of topics such as snacks and meals, storage of emergency medication, addresses classroom issues related to food allergies such as science projects and other manipulatives, as well as hand washing policies.

 

Many people, including school administrators, get 504 Plans confused with IEPs.  An IEP is an Individual Education Plan which allows students with disabilities (often learning or cognitive disabilities) to receive specialized instruction and/or related services.  IEP qualification is determined both at meetings and in conjunction with standardized assessments, as well as other data collection.  504 Plans are determined by looking at medical records. Both are federally funded programs: 504 Plans guarantee access to education while IEPs provide supplemental academic services.

 

I recently came across an incredibly thorough and helpful article written by Vivian Stock-Hendel on fellow blogger, Sharon Wong’s blog “Nut Free Wok.”  Entitled, Food Allergy 101: 1, 2, 3…504 , you will learn everything you need to know about completing a 504 Plan and what to do if you need both a 504 and IEP.

 

Keep in mind, both plans can be used at schools which receive federal funding.  If your child attends private school, ask someone in administration if the school makes food allergy accommodations through 504 Plans or by another means.

 

Best of luck!

 

Additional Resources:

FARE: Advocacy – Section 504 and Written Management Plans

Food Allergy Action Plan Template

 

Girl Scout Cookies Allergen Reference February 24, 2016

Thanks-A-Lot Girl Scout Cookies

I remember being a Brownie.  To me, selling Girl Scout cookies was kind of intimidating.  I didn’t like going door to door and asking people to buy things.  There wasn’t any opportunity to set up a stand with friends in my town.  I might have been braver in that case:  you know, power in numbers.

 

As an adult, I want to support those adorable, little Girl Scouts who are sometimes nervous just like I was.   Which is why I hate having to say no due to food allergies issues.

 

So, I did a little research in the hopes that it helps you all make good decisions and allows you to support your local Brownies and Girl Scouts… by buying delicious cookies!  Now that I’m armed with some information, our family may try some ourselves this year!

 

Girl Scout cookies are made by one of two manufacturers:  ABC Smart Cookies or Little Brownie Bakers.  To find out which manufacturer bakes your local Girl Scout cookies, you must contact your local council:  locate your council here.

 

Here is the 2017-18 list of Girl Scout Cookies and known allergens. 

Screenshot 2018-02-01 17.50.33

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While Little Brownie Bakers do not list ingredients lists for their cookies on their website, their allergen statement looks thorough.  All it should take is a quick peruse of the ingredient list on the box to determine whether the box is safe for your family.  Here’s their allergen statement:

The allergen statement clearly states the top 8 allergens contained inside each package. We encourage consumers with food allergies to check the ingredient statement on each package for the most current ingredient information because product formulations can change at any time.

If the allergen in concern is not listed below the ingredient statement, we are confident that the product is safe for consumption. Please trust the labeling. We do use a may contain statement for peanuts and tree nuts when the product is produced on a line that shares equipment with another product that does contain peanuts or tree nuts. Scientific evidence has shown that consumers with peanut and tree nut allergies can have a severe reaction to amounts that are below the current detectable limits based on existing technology.

For this reason, we have chosen to warn consumers allergic to peanuts and tree nuts of the potential for extremely low levels by using a may contain statement. The equipment is thoroughly cleaned in between processes and we follow Good Manufacturing Practices in all of our facilities. Beyond the top eight allergens, all ingredients are declared within the ingredient statement. If you are concerned about a specific ingredient, please review the ingredient statement to determine if it is part of the product formulation.

 

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ABC Smart Cookies, the Girl Scout’s other cookie manufacturer, also seems food allergy savvy.  They produce gluten-free cookies in a certified gluten-free facility and have a well-educated allergen statement which reads:

 

Over a decade ago, ABC partnered with Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN™) to learn more about life-threatening food allergies and the impact of ingredient labeling and allergen warnings. We have also worked with the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program in association with the University of Nebraska to review our sanitation, handling, and training procedures.  ABC adopted what is known as “product-specific” allergen labeling. Product-specific labeling enables the allergy-affected consumer to make an informed decision based on information specific to that particular product.

Product-specific labeling requires strict compliance to good manufacturing practices to prevent cross contamination such as:

  • Segregation of known allergens from the general production environment
  • Color-coding of storage units and utensils
  • Curtained-off production areas
  • Designated lanes for transportation of known allergens
  • Swabbing and testing of allergen shared equipment

In addition, we call out all allergens on our packaging, order cards and web site and provide specific warning if a product is made on a line that also produces product with a common allergen such as peanuts. ABC’s proactive approach to allergens is an example of our commitment to producing the best quality Girl Scout Cookies possible for the millions of valued consumers who support Girl Scouting every year.

 

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A quick review of ingredients show that all of the cookies were egg-free; Thin Mints, Cranberry Citrus Crisps, Lemonades, and Thanks-a-Lots are nut-free; several were vegan and therefore dairy-free; and at least one variety was gluten-free.  Check out their sites and I think you’ll find, like I did, that Girl Scout cookies are far more food allergy-friendly than you think!  Now, get out there and say YES! to some Girl Scouts.  You’ll make their day!

 

 

Girl Scout cookies

 

 

A Look Ahead: A Summary of Teens and Food Allergies December 3, 2015

I have a food allergic 10 year old.  I’m starting to see all those signs of tweeny-ness that my friends have been talking about.  And, although I could use a lot less eye rolling and smart alecky retorts, but I understand this is a (questionably) necessary right of passage into his more independent teen years.

Do you all remember being a teenager?  How many ill thought out decisions did you make?  My oldest child will be a teen before I know it and he’ll be faced with choices of his own.  The only way he’ll grow is to make mistakes, I know.  But when food allergies are a part of your life, small mistakes could be costly.

So, even if you don’t have a teen YET, please read on so as your kid ages you know what to look out for:

According to an article posted on Radio Canada International [Severe Allergy Risk Worse Among Teens, Young Adults], there are several issues at play during the teenage years that put them at greater risk for a severe food allergy reaction:

  1. They believe they are invincible.  Having had the minutia of their lives cushioned by their parents, teachers, etc up until these years, they feel they are unstoppable.
  2. They typically feel a strong need to conform to their peer group.  Admitting to a food allergy, needing to ask multiple and sometimes persistent questions at meals, not to mention carrying often bulky epinephrine doesn’t make them invisible.  If anything, it highlights their “differentness.”
  3. Teens are independent creatures.  They may balk against whatever makes them feel limited.

According to Dr. Scott Sicherer of Mt. Sinai in practical terms this means:

  • They fail to tell their peers about their condition.
  • They don’t want to/don’t know how to speak up to authority figures (such as teachers, waiters, etc) and alert them of their food allergies and dietary limitations.
  • Teens often leave their emergency medication at home – particularly when active and/or wearing something fashionable that leaves little room for autoinjectors.
  • They taste foods to see if it might contain an allergen, rather than reading labels.  My guess is that it may be harder for teens to reject an invitation to taste something “amazing” or even terrible, particularly if it means that behavior allows them to better fit in with their social circle.

The Radio Canada article goes on to quote Dr. Adella Atkinson, who offers a few helpful suggestions:

  • Start the conversation about food allergies early.  Without scaring them, very young children should be aware that some foods can make them sick.  Empowering young children will enable them to more confidently handle their food allergies as they age.
  • Provide choices.  [I thought this was the best suggestion I’ve heard in a while.  I can’t wait to implement it this weekend!]  Decisions about who and which kind of epinephrine autoinjector to carry, what kind of cuisine they’d like to eat, what their food plan is for outings without you will again empower them and force them to think through their food allergy roadblocks before they hit them.
  • In the WebMD article, Teens With Food Allergies Take Risks, Dr. Sicherer goes on to suggest educating friends as a secondary safety net.  This has already served us well [See That’s What Friends Are For] as my son’s friends help look out for him, are careful to make eating a more INCLUSIVE rather than exclusive experience, avoid eating my son’s allergen around him, and have been taught how to use epinephrine autoinjectors.
  • Teach your child’s friends how to use an autoinjector.  This is a great use of old EpiPens and Auvi-Qs and tweens and teens find it interesting.  By now, they’ve usually seen autoinjectors before and have loads of excellent questions.  Practice using autoinjectors by injecting them into an orange or grapefruit.
  • Buy/create several different accessories to help your tween or teen wear her epinephrine in all circumstances.  A dress with no pockets?  No problem!  Going skiing? We’ve got your covered.  School dance?  Don’t worry: there’s a way to wear it there too!  [See Your Growing Child: How to Carry Epinephrine]

But the most important thing you can do is keep up the conversation.  Not only are food allergies dangerous, they are stressful.  Keep talking to your tween and teen about them.  Make sure they know the door is wide open to discuss anything that comes up surrounding them.  And, present them with the big picture:  that you might want to fit in during your teens but you want to stand out in your twenties.  Encourage them to get a head start by being careful and responsible with their health!

 

Need to Whip Up a Last Minute Dessert? Dairy-free, Egg-Free and Maybe Even Gluten-Free Cookies November 26, 2014

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve realized my amazing dessert plan is too elaborate or altogether unnecessary for a big meal like Thanksgiving.  If you find yourself in a crunch (or if you’re just in the mood for a classic with a twist), check out this recipe originally posted in 2011.  The delicious hints of pie spice and pumpkin are reminiscent of a traditional Turkey Day pie but the chocolate makes it sooo much more satisfying!  My mouth is watering just remembering how good these were.  I barely have time, but I might just have to work these in tomorrow…

 

 These cookies are adapted from a recipe I found that was already egg-free (a great start!). But I’ve tweaked it to be dairy and nut-free and included a reviewer’s suggestion at the bottom for making them gluten-free as well! This recipe produces a ton of cookies, so invite the neighbors over about 5 minutes after they’ve cooled to help you chow down.
 

Ingredients (**see bottom for gluten-free substitutions**):

 
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup dairy-free margarine
  • 1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour** (see below for gluten-free substitution)
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
 

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

 

Cream the sugar, shortening, pumpkin and vanilla together. Mix until light and well combined.

 

Mix the flour, baking soda and pumpkin pie spice. Stir the flour mixture into the creamed mixture. Mix until combined. Stir in the chocolate chips.

  

Drop by teaspoons onto an ungreased baking sheet. Bake at 375 degrees F for 12 to 15 minutes or until set. Let cookies cool on a rack.

 
Makes 4 dozen cookies.
 
**To make them gluten-free, one reviewer commented that she substituted the following for the flour:
  • 2 cup rice flour
  • 1 cup soy flour
  • 1 cup tapioca flour
  • 2 teaspoon xanthan gum
  

I am thankful for these cookies!

 

Now What? What To Do After Receiving a Food Allergy Diagnosis April 25, 2014

 

The child of a friend of mine was just diagnosed with a peanut allergy.  Until I began to discuss what this meant with her, I had forgotten just how overwhelming the initial part of this process can be.

 

So, what DO you do upon learning you or your child has a food allergy?  Where to begin!?  Don’t panic, take a deep breath and follow these few steps to get started:

 

1.  Find a recommended allergist; preferably one who specializes in food allergies.  Often times, food allergy diagnoses emerge from a pediatric/internist visit or a trip to the emergency room.  And while these professionals are knowledgeable, it’s important to touch base with an allergist who is on top of ever-changing information and treatment.  Our fabulous pediatrician not only has a child with food allergies but is food allergic herself.  And despite that, even SHE defers to our allergist!

 

2.  Fill your prescriptions and learn how to use your auto-injector.   There’s no wrong answer when it comes to choosing which auto-injector to use (see: Auvi-Q vs. EpiPen: Which Is Best for You?) .  And you can learn how to use them here:  Familiarize or Refamiliarize Yourself With How to Use an EpiPen and Auvi-Q: Watch and Learn.  While you’re at the pharmacy, I would pick up a couple of boxes of Benadryl (for kids, at least two liquid packages) to keep in your house and at school.

  

3.  Review your pantry and devise a labeling system.  It’s important to make your home a safe space to eat.  Begin by reading ingredient lists and separate safe and unsafe foods.  Put that dining room table to good use!  And, don’t forget: manufacturing being what it is, many products are made on equipment that contains your allergen and should be put aside until you speak to your allergist.  An example of a labeling system can be found here.

  

4.  Create an Emergency Action Plan and an Emergency On-the-Go Pack.  An Emergency Action Plan eliminates questions and increases your confidence about what to do when certain symptoms arise.  You can have your pediatrician/internist or your allergist fill one out for you. Make a few copies to keep at home, school, in the car, on the fridge, in your On-the-Go Kit, etc.  The more, the better!

 

An Emergency On-the-Go Pack corrals all your emergency medication, including your auto-injector, plus your Emergency Action Plan and a copy of your insurance card into one pouch.  You’ll always know that you have all of your necessary supplies when you leave the house.  Plus, it will make it super-simple to pass your pack between bags or to another caregiver and know that everything your child needs to stay safe is at hand.

 

A few notes:  Jot down questions as they arise in this early part of the process.  Use your questions as discussion points and get clear answers from your allergist.  Please refer to Allergy Shmallergy’s SCHOOL category to get ideas of how to handle allergy issues at your child’s school, starting with Back to School Food Allergy Checklist.

 

Most of all, remain calm!  Managing with a food allergy certainly requires a different perspective on life.  But, it doesn’t need to be stress inducing.  Staying informed and answering each challenge with simple solutions will allow your family to thrive.

 

 

 

Preparing for an Egg-Safe Easter and Avoid Articial Dyes! April 16, 2014

 (Photo: SheKnows)
 

Eggs and Easter are virtually synonymous.  But what do you do when you have an egg allergy?  

 

We had been using plastic eggs to hide safe candy for years.  My food allergic son was thrilled with the hunt, but it just didn’t feel like Easter unless we were sitting around smelly bowls of colored vinegar dyeing eggs.  When he was at the height of his egg allergy, I finally asked our allergist if my son could participate in this fabulous Easter tradition.  He informed us that the shell of an egg is made almost entirely of calcium carbonate – the same material found in sea shells, chalk, and pearls – and NOT the egg protein that my son was so allergic to.   Which meant…. that he could safely handle eggs enough to dye them!  

 

My son still couldn’t eat the eggs themselves, but faced with a choice between jelly beans, peeps and a hard boiled egg…  it didn’t feel like he was missing out!

 
If you are avoiding artificial coloring, try some of these natural dye recipes from Better Homes and Gardens:

 

 

Get Started on Passover with an Egg and Nut Allergy April 9, 2014

Spring holidays are upon us!  And while they are festive, they can be very difficult for those with food allergies.  Particularly if you have an egg or nut allergy.

 

Have no fear:  Allergy Shmallergy is here to help!

 

Let’s first discuss Passover as that is the holiday approaching the soonest.   Passover is a week-long holiday highlighted by a huge feast marked with tradition called a Seder.  Because many families eat according to tradition by avoiding leavened bread, many cooks are improving with matzo this time of year.  This becomes a challenge for us egg-free families, since egg is often used as a binder in food containing matzo.

 

Below is a link to an Egg-Free Matzo Ball recipe I found a few years ago.  There’s nothing like Matzo Ball Soup (at Passover or anytime throughout the year), so this recipe comes in VERY handy!

 

Egg-free eaters, aren’t the only ones who struggle at Passover.  Nuts dot several traditional dishes and desserts, including one right on the seder plate:  Charoset.  The link below also includes a delicious nut-free charoset recipe that your guests will be excited to indulge in.

Allergy-Free Charoset and Egg-Free Matzoh Balls

 

For an egg-free, nut-free dessert, why not try my favorite Sorbet Pie or some other passover friendly filled pie?  I came across this recipe and can’t wait to use it on Monday.  I’m thinking Raspberry Sorbet AND Chocolate Mousse Pies…. Mmmm…

 

Pesach Pie Crust (via food.com)

Shmallergy Sorbet Pie

 

I’ll continue to post any allergy-friendly Passover recipes I come across.  In the meantime, you get cooking!

 

 

 

Sweetheart Sorbet Pie January 27, 2014

Hello, everyone!

Another candy-based holiday is around the corner.  A wonderful time, unless you have food allergies… and then creating a special treat can be quite a challenge!  And that’s where Sweetheart Sorbet Pie comes in!

 

I created this when my son announced that he didn’t really care for cake.  And that meant no more cupcakes either… (Sigh!)

 

Thinking about how much I loved ice cream cake, we invented sorbet pie!  It’s quick, easy, delicious and appropriate for all kinds of special occasions – or for no reason at all.

 

Ingredients:

 

2 pints of your favorite, safe sorbet

1 9-inch graham cracker pie crust

Berries, sprinkles, safe dairy-free chocolate chips (optional)

 

 Step 1:  Gather your ingredients and let your sorbet sit out for about 5-10 minutes.

20140112-210216.jpg

 

Step 2:  When soft, stir the sorbet either in its container or in a bowl.

20140112-210232.jpg

 

Step 3:  When slightly melted and malleable, scoop into the pie crust and spread using the back of a spoon or soft spatula.

20140112-210246.jpg

 
Step 4:  Continue to add sorbet and spread until the pie crust is filled.  Smooth out top.

20140112-210300.jpg

 

Step 5:  Should you wish, add berries, dairy-free chocolate chips, sprinkles or any other type of deliciousness you can think of… and then freeze for at least 2 hours.

20140112-210312.jpg

 

Step 6:  Let thaw for a few minutes, slice and enjoy with your big and/or little sweethearts!

20140127-133110.jpg

 

Hosting Guests with Food Allergies for the Holidays? No Problem! December 11, 2013

As if there isn’t enough to do to get ready for the holidays, preparing your house for visitors can be stressful.  And, treading into the unfamiliar territory of food allergies can completely overwhelm hosts.

 

Well, never fear!  Allergy Shmallergy is here to help and get you started to safely hosting a guest with food allergies.

 

1.  Speak with the food allergic guest or parent (if a child has food allergies) and understand the scope of his/her food allergies.

 

2.  Ask for a list of a few foods that would be helpful for the guest to have on hand.  For example, my parents always make sure there is soy milk in the fridge and safe cereal for my dairy and nut-allergic son.

 

3.  You may wish to consider keeping a basket or clearing out a small drawer to keep safe snacks and food for your guest.  This is especially helpful if your food allergic guest is a child. By knowing where to find safe food, this may reduce the chances that he/she will accidentally reach for something that could cause a reaction.

 

4.  As for the kitchen, if you regularly cook with your guest’s allergen, you’ll want to thoroughly wash the cutlery, cutting boards, counters, pots and pans that you plan on using to prepare food.  A run through the dishwasher should sanitize them, but a good scrub in the sink will work as well.

 

5.  Discuss your menu with your food allergic guest.  In a perfect world, everything would be safe for him/her, but try to ensure that he/she can make a meal out of what is on the table .  Check here for easy substitutions:

Baking Substitutions from the Pros

And, there are many options for dairy-free margarine and butter in the average supermarket.  Look for Smart Balance Organic and Earth’s Balance brands to name a few.

prod-spread-original

 

6.  Finally, be sure to learn how to use your guest’s emergency medications.  You probably won’t need to use them, but you’ll feel much more confident just knowing how.

  

For more tips on hosting a guest with food allergies, read here:

 

A Host’s Guide to Allergies

The Host’s Guide: Part II

The Host’s Guide: Part III

 

Food Allergy-Friendly Ideas for Your Class Halloween Party October 24, 2013

Looking for a fun, allergy-friendly way to spook up your class Halloween party?

 

Here are some fantastic suggestions.  I wish I could claim credit for all of them, but instead I stand in awe of people’s creativity just like you.  I’ve tried to link them to their original posts where I could for recipes and instructions.  Check these out!

 
 

My boys will LOVE these from The Outlaw Mom:

Fun & Easy Halloween Food
 
 
And, I’m 100% doing this for our pre-Trick-or-Treating appetizer from My Journey To Health.  Maybe hummus instead of the dairy-based dip?  *Just remember to use tahini-free hummus if you have a sesame seed allergy!*
 
 
This would be so simple – and healthy – for a class party via Decorating By Day:
  
  

Who doesn’t love pigs in a blanket?!  I mean…Hot Dog Mummies.  Great idea via Seakettle:

Mummy dogs!
 
 
 

Everyone loves breadsticks!  To make them allergy-friendly, skip the cheese and use dairy-free butter and you’re good to go!

Breadstick Bones and Marinara

 
 

Are you serious?!  Peeps makes Halloween ghosts!

Creepy Halloween Food & Spooky Halloween Food | Best #Halloween Costumes & Decor
 
 

I’m so inspired by these creations, I’m now planning a Halloween party just for our family!

 

 
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