Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Prep Your Meds for School: Refill Options July 28, 2017

Time to get your emergency medications ready for school.  Don’t worry:  there’s still lots of summer fun to be had!  But to maximize summer fun over back-to-school frenzy, there are a few things you can do.

img_5770

  1. Check the Date:  Check the expiration dates on your epinephrine auto-injectors.  If they are due to expire between now and December, it may be a good time to consider refilling your prescription.
  2. Know Your Options:
    • There are several choices of epinephrine auto-injectors these days and they all efficiently deliver the same life-saving drug (epinephrine) in different ways.  I’ll outline those different auto-injectors below.
    • Talk to your doctor and consider your lifestyle when choosing your auto-injector.
    • Be sure you, your school nurse, caretaker, and child are all familiar with how to operate the auto-injector(s) you choose to stock at home, school and elsewhere.
  3. Update Your Emergency Action Plan:  Your doctor may have provided you with one or you can take Allergy Shmallergy’s Emergency Action Plan to your doctor on your next appointment.  Make a copy for home, your car, on-the-go, and school.
  4. Ask Directly:  You may need to ask your doctor specifically for the auto-injector you wish to use.  Some doctors prescribe only one without discussion, but are certainly willing to write a prescription for the auto-injector that works best for you.

 

What ARE the options for epinephrine auto-injector:

img_3973

Auvi-Q:

Yes, it’s back on the market and better than ever.  Auvi-Q delivers epinephrine via a compact package that speaks to you.  You heard that right: it talks you through an injection, even counting down the length of time you are supposed to hold the device in place.  Plus, the needle automatically retracts, reducing the possibility of post-injection injury.  Each Auvi-Q is about the size of a deck of playing cards, easy to carry for everyone (especially teens, young adults and fathers – who can fit them in their pockets).

 

*Auvi-Q automatically ships and delivers their auto-injectors directly to you.  Initiate this process with your doctor.  To read more about their direct delivery service as well as their cost-coverage programs, refer to the Affordability program page.

 

img_4709

Adrenaclick:

Adrenaclick has a slimmer profile than the well-know EpiPen, but is about the same length. Adrenaclick is a no frills epinephrine auto-injector, often used as a generic for EpiPen.  In fact, responding to the rising costs of brand name epinephrine auto-injectors, CVS pharmacies (among others) replaced its stock of auto-injectors with Adrenaclick. In their words, “Patients can now purchase the authorized generic for Adrenaclick®… This authorized generic is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved device with the same active ingredient as other epinephrine auto-injector devices.”

 

*IMPORTANT, Adrenaclick operates differently than EpiPens and they DO NOT come with a trainer.  If you choose to use this useful auto-injector, be sure to also place an order for an Andrenaclick trainer.  And, do your research for best pricing locally.

 

EpiPen:

EpiPens are the most widely used and most familiar of the epinephrine auto-injectors.  In fact, its familiarity is what keeps many customers coming back.  School nurses and even non-allergic individuals may be more accustomed to its look and how to use it.  In addition, EpiPens are substantial – making them easy to find in a backpack or purse.  In 2016 Mylan, the manufacturers of EpiPen, released a generic of its own product in response to public pressure over its pricing.  Both products contain the same medication and use the same or similar injector mechanisms.  EpiPen’s price has not been reduced in any way and is the most expensive auto-injector on the market.  The generic version is less expensive, but still a price worth considering for many.

*Mylan does offer coupons which can be found on their website.

Advertisements
 

Food Allergy Retrospective: How Far Have We Come? May 17, 2017

When the term “food allergies” was first mentioned in our lives in 2005, my son was only a few months old.  Already suffering from severe, body-encompassing eczema and a family history of food allergies, my pediatrician mentioned that we’d have to approach first foods very carefully with him.  I thought she was being WAY overcautious.  Like a ridiculous amount.  I was told to avoid feeding him anything with peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, wheat, soy, shellfish, fish, strawberries, pork, and corn in it.  I remember thinking, who had ever heard of anyone allergic to corn?!  And, so much for Cheerios as a finger food!

 

Now twelve years later, I think about what a genius that same pediatrician was and what a long way we’ve come since that first discussion about food allergies.

 

In 2005, there were approximately 11 million Americans living with food allergies.  Today, there are 15 million. And that number is growing.  Back in 2005 there may have been 1 child with food allergies per class; now there are at least 2 in every classroom.

 

In 2005, there were no food allergen labeling laws.  Manufacturers could “disguise” ingredients under a variety of names.  If you were allergic to dairy, for example, you had to memorize over 45 different names of ingredients that contained milk protein (whey, cream, casein, lactose, curd, rennet, ghee, flavoring… read the complete list here).  There were no suggestions to include voluntary “may contain” statements.  And, manufacturers were not well informed about how to respond to customer service questions about the safety of their products.

 

In 2005, consumers had less choice of emergency medication but it was far more affordable.  A pair of EpiPens cost only about $50. Other epinephrine auto-injectors were hard to come by and Auvi-Q wasn’t even invented yet.

 

In 2005, I felt alone with my son’s condition.  I started writing about food allergies, in part, to reach out to other like-minded parents experiencing the same daily struggles and triumphs that I was.  There was no research about the psychological impact of growing up with food allergies.  I was figuring out how to parent a confident, competent kid AND how to safely navigate the world with food allergies all at once.

 

I am so thankful to you all today for being part of the Allergy Shmallergy community – for giving me feedback, reminding me that we’re not alone running into and overcoming food allergy-obstacles, and for supporting each other, helping to make each other’s lives simpler and happier.

thank-you-362164_1920 pixabay ryan mcguire

 

 

 

 

The Fire Drill – 5 Key Lessons from an Intensely Scary Night February 22, 2017

phone-656263_1280-pixabay

I had been home from the restaurant only ten minutes with my preschooler almost tucked into bed when I got the call.

 

“Miles isn’t feeling well. He’s nauseous and is having terrible asthma. We’re heading home early,“ my husband informed me calmly. My husband and two sons left our regular sushi dinner to attend a tennis lesson, still chewing as they walked out the door.

 

My oldest son has suffered from asthma since he was 10 months old, but this just didn’t sound like the typical onset of asthma for him. Something about Eric’s voice suggested something “other.” “Do you think it could be a food allergy reaction?” I asked.

 

“I don’t know; but we’re getting home as quickly as possible.”

 

Completely abandoning my daughter in her bed, I walked to our emergency medication and unsheathed the freshest EpiPen. I was reviewing our emergency action plan as headlights tore into the driveway.

 

Calm but focused, I greeted my son at the door. He was red and hot and choking out words as I tried to check in with him about his symptoms. He could barely speak. He felt nauseous and clutched his stomach as he made his way into the bathroom, afraid he would throw up. His description of his symptoms came out in – sometimes inaudible – spurts. He was fighting for breath. He felt and looked worse than I had ever seen him.

 

While my hand calmly rubbed his back and my eyes scanned his face assessing the situation, a million thoughts raced through me in a nanosecond. Was it something he ate? Was he possibly reacting to a new allergen? Was this anaphylaxis or pure asthma…or both? The flu and other upper respiratory viruses were spreading so rampantly that nearly a third of my son’s class was out that week. And, he had mentioned having a headache and feeling a little nauseous after school – something that had seemingly subsided by dinner.

 

No matter how I weighed my options, a few small words reverberated in my brain: two systems. Most emergency action plans state that if two or more essential systems (gut/stomach, lungs, skin, heart) are affected in an allergic reaction, epinephrine should be administered immediately. I held up the auto-injectors behind my son’s back, signaling to my husband that we might need to use them. Neither of us have had to use an auto-injector on my son before (knock on everything wooden). We knew it was probably the right call now. We were both looking for the other to validate that decision.

 

As with all things, I wanted the use of the auto-injector to be the absolute right decision. I called my father-in-law, a doctor of more than 40 years, for one last vote on how to proceed. It was a brief conversation. “Get him breathing! Give him albuterol, I’m coming right over.”

 

Having caught sight of me waving the EpiPen in the air to my husband, my son had now begun to sweat with panic – making everything much worse. I sat him on the couch and tried to cool him off for just a moment – considering the facts again. Asthma. Nausea. No throat, mouth, or tongue swelling. No hives. No clear relationship between this reaction and food – but always a real possibility.

 

I looked at my sweet boy once again, suffering for breath, and noticed his pallor wasn’t quite as red any longer; it was now tingeing blue. I grabbed the epinephrine and pulled off the safety cap. At that very moment, my brother-in-law (another doctor) and father-in-law walked through the door. With stethoscope in hand and exuding a calm and caring in doses that make me tear up in appreciation even now, they examined my son and set him up on a nebulizer – a machine that delivers asthma and other respiratory medications as a penetrating, breathable mist.

 

We monitored Miles’ pulse (which was steady) and his breathing (which was labored and difficult). It took a lot of medication and effort, but Miles began processing air more efficiently. I didn’t realize until the second hour of treatment that I had been clutching his auto-injector the entire time.

 

As Miles’ color returned and the dust began to settle, he began to recall details about his day – clues that might have been helpful earlier. Like, the fact that he experienced asthma during recess at school. As he continued to improve, we noted that he was simultaneously experiencing a migraine, which can bring about nausea. Together, we determined that this was likely an acute asthma attack and not a result of his food allergies.

 

All four adults watched Miles for another several hours (well into the night) before anyone was willing to even entertain sleep. And, by then, sleep didn’t come so easily. I awoke in a gasping sweat several times that night and slipped into my son’s room to check on him. At around 5:45 am, I placed my hand on his back and he broke the quiet of the pre-dawn, humorously stating, “Mommy. Your hand is like a furnace!” Smiling and with great relief, I knew the sun would come up that morning and all would be well.

When I relayed these events to my own father, he captured it perfectly. “You had a fire drill last night.” We certainly did. And, as with any good training exercise (intentional or not), we learned some valuable lessons that night.

 

  1. Trust your instincts. I knew we needed to use epinephrine. Had there not been two doctors in the family within arms’ distance from me, I would have absolutely used it. And, so would my husband. Even though it was not anaphylaxis and everything turned out well, I STILL regret not having used the auto-injector sooner. I had my doubts about a food allergy reaction for a number of reasons. The afternoon nausea as well as the absence of hives and swelling gave me pause – which is why I called my father-in-law. But, did being right about his diagnosis make me feel better about my hesitation? No. Severe food allergic reactions can present themselves with a number of symptoms and they can escalate very quickly.

 

  1. Always, ALWAYS carry your epinephrine auto-injector with you. EVERY TIME. And, make sure that your friends, family and/or whoever is caring for your child knows how to use it (procedures are slightly different for Auvi-Q, the Adrenaclick and the EpiPen, so I recommend reviewing often). In our case, we accidentally forgot to transfer the auto-injectors from my purse to my husband’s bag, taking for granted that he’d no longer be around food; out only for an hour to play tennis. Thankfully, we live two minutes from the tennis courts. But had they been further, my husband would ABSOLUTELY have needed those auto-injectors.

img_3973

  1. As if you needed an extra reason to carry your auto-injectors: Those who have asthma are more likely to suffer from severe food allergic reactions– particularly if that asthma is not well-controlled. Asthma can complicate food allergies. Asthma occurs when there is narrowing of the airways, making it difficult for an individual to take in the proper amount of air. In my son’s case, his lungs were taking in so little air that initially my father-in-law couldn’t hear any movement with his stethoscope. No wonder he was turning blue. In an emergency situation, epinephrine can be used to treat a severe asthma attack. We were milliseconds from using it.

 

  1. If you use an epinephrine auto-injector you must go the nearest emergency room immediately. This is not because you gave the injection. Rather, those having severe food allergic reactions need additional medication and treatment. Furthermore, patients can suffer something call a bi-phasic reaction – that is, a second, delayed bout of anaphylaxis. It is estimated that up to 20% of patients suffer such a reaction.

 

  1. Once Miles went to sleep, we recapped the night with my father-in-law, who’s served in some fast-paced emergency rooms. I’ve been repeating something he said that night to everyone who will listen:

“We used to tell surgical residents,” he began, “‘If you’re considering performing a tracheotomy, then you need to do a tracheotomy.’”  The same holds true for anaphylaxis. If you think you might need to use an auto-injector, then you DO need to use one. If you’re considering it, then the time is now.

 

I’m beyond grateful that our story ends happily.  I pray you all never have to experience the intensity of a severe reaction (whether that be from food allergies or acute asthma).  But I hope that by sharing our experience and the lessons we learned, your story will end happily, too.

 


 

Essential Resource:

I can’t recommend enough this informative piece on when to give what medication during a severe allergic reaction. The information contained in this article echoed in my head during the above incident.

 

From the Food Allergy Treatment Talk blog:

Putting the Fire by Dr. Brian Schroer

 

Your Growing Child: How to Carry Epinephrine August 11, 2015

Filed under: Preparedness,Uncategorized — malawer @ 10:00 am
Tags: , , , ,

As a parent of a food allergic child, you are the person responsible for carrying your son/daughter’s epinephrine and other rescue medication.  As your child ages, however, he will not only go on play dates or attend sports practices and games without you, but she’ll want to go the movies with her friends or walk around the school fair.

My son, who is now 10, has shown a definite preference to carry his own epinephrine in certain situations.  If he’ll be indoors (or it’s cool out), he’ll stick it in his sporty cinch backpack alongside an inhaler and whatever else he brings along that day.  If it’s hot out, we throw the meds in an insulated lunchbox alongside an ice pack or a bottle of ice water and place that inside a cinch bag.

As he grows he may wish to try a few alternatives to remain prepared.  If you’re an adult or teenager with allergies, there are a few convenient ways to wear (yes, wear) epinephrine below.  In fact, I plan to get a few for MYSELF to help him carry his rescue meds while we’re active or on-the-go.

Keeping your or your kids’ rescue meds with them should be easy – no matter which autoinjector you prefer.  Below are some pretty cool and easy ways to carry epinephrine no matter where you go or what you do.  *Just remember, epinephrine needs to be kept at room temperature or below to keep from compromising its potency – see EpiPens in Sun or Snow for further details.*

Auvi-Q Epinephrine Auto-injector Case (Red)

Auvi-Q Autoinjector Case by Rescue Shot Case

  • LegBuddy by OmaxCare

  • Gourmet Getaway Mini Snack Tote

    BuiltNY’s Gourmet Getaway Insulated Lunch Sack

AimTrend All-Purpose Pocket Cinch Drawstring Gym Bag, Lime/Smoke

AimTrend’s Cinch Backpack Gym Bag

Skecher’s Sequin Backpack

 

Food Allergy Awareness Week: What You Can Do to Educate Others May 13, 2015

Filed under: Preparedness — malawer @ 8:00 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

FAAW.jpg

Happy Wednesday, everyone!  Check out my latest post over at ContentChecked for simple, easy things you can do to participate in Food Allergy Awareness Week/Month!

What YOU Can Do to Education Others

Excerpt:

Parents of children with food allergies live with certain challenges day in and day out.  We read labels, ask questions, and are prepared for any emergency.  And although we are adept at handling food-related obstacles, that doesn’t mean that the greater community is intentionally setting them up.  In fact, in my experience, most people are well meaning but simply don’t know enough about food allergies.  They want to be helpful, but don’t know how…. read more

 

Spring Cleaning: How to Properly Dispose of Epinephrine Auto-Injectors May 19, 2014

Filed under: Health — malawer @ 12:54 pm
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

 

I’m deep into spring cleaning (yes, right before the onset of summer) and have a stockpile of expired EpiPens and Auvi-Qs to get rid of.  But what should you do with them?

 

1.  Keep the auto-injectors in their protective cases.  Even if you’ve used them, return them to their cases to safeguard anyone who may handle them after that.

 

2.  Do not throw epinephrine auto-injectors in the trash.  Since they contain needles, that may be considered a “medical sharp” which poses a safety hazard to sanitation workers and the environment.

 

3.  So where should they go?

  • The best place to bring them is to your nearest hospital or doctor’s office where they likely have proper medical sharp disposal.
  • Another great place to try is your local pharmacy.  Call ahead to see if they participate in a medical waste disposal program and specifically ask about medical sharps.
  • Many towns and cities host Household Hazardous Waste collection drives.  Call your local government to find out when a drive will run near you and, again, ask specifically about medical sharps.  Our local collection could not accept them but each town has different capabilities.
 

I think I’m going to set mine aside until I take my son for his regular check up at our allergist’s office.   With a toddler in tow, I’m all about making the fewest stops these days!

 

Stock Up on Epinephrine for School: No Co-Pays Until December 2013 August 6, 2013

Yes, we STILL have nearly a month left before school begins.  Don’t worry!  But if you’re even thinking  about preparing for the upcoming school year, be sure to include epinephrine on your To-Do List.

 

First, double check the expiration dates on your epinephrine supply.

 

Second, make sure you have at least two, preferably three sets of epinephrine auto-injectors that are active (one for school, one for home, and a mobile set to bring with you on-the-go).

 

Third, renew your prescriptions now to make sure they are still current (and to give you time to contact your allergist if they’re not) as well as to avoid that last minute panic before the beginning of school.

 

Finally, now is a great time to take advantage of the no co-pay promotions from the makers of both EpiPens and Auvi-Q.   Both companies have issued a $0 co-pay program from now until December 2013.   Now’s a great time to restock your epinephrine for free!  Program details below:

 

EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Program:  https://activatemysavings.com/epipen/

 

Auvi-Q Support and Savings Program:  http://www.auvi-q.com/support-and-savings

**As always, it’s important to discuss the various auto-injector options and which is best for your particular needs with your doctor.**

Savings