Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

What is Lupin Allergy and Why You Should Care June 26, 2017

Lupin allergy is on the rise.  But most people haven’t even heard of lupin in the first place.    Travelers to Europe, Australia, Canada, the Mediterranean and even the U.S. should become familiar with it.  So should those who are gluten-free as well as those who have a peanut or soy allergy.

 

Read the article I recently wrote for the Allergy & Asthma Network, entitled “Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?” to find out what lupin is, where it is found and who is most at risk for a reaction.

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Why Is Lupin Allergy Becoming More Common?
from the Allergy & Asthma Network dated June 14, 2017

 

Have you heard of lupin? Don’t feel bad; most Americans haven’t heard of it either. But that’s likely to change.

 

What is lupin?

Lupin (or lupine) beans are legumes – putting them in the same plant family as the peanut. Lupin beans are high in antioxidants, dietary fiber and protein and low in starch. And like all legumes, they are gluten-free.

Lupin beans are commonly used in Mediterranean cuisine. Sometimes ground into flour and blended into regular wheat flour, lupin is also widely used in Europe and Australia. There, lupin is frequently found in baked goods and pastas as well as breads, sauces, beverages (such as beer) and meat-based products like sausage and hamburgers.

Lupin is showing up in the United States as well. It appears most often as a substitute for gluten or soy in free-from products as well as replacement for genetically modified ingredients and animal proteins (primarily dairy and egg).

 

Can you be allergic to lupin?

Although not one of the “Top 8” allergens, lupin is beginning to make headlines in the food allergy world. For many, eating products containing lupin is completely safe. However, for a few, lupin can trigger an allergic reaction. The odds of having a reaction are higher if you already have a peanut allergy. This is called cross-sensitivity.

There is no evidence that lupin allergy is more severe than other allergens. Like all allergic reactions, symptoms vary. Those who are allergic to lupin have reported reactions ranging from hives, swelling of the lips and face, to gastrointestinal and respiratory distress, and cardiovascular issues.

 

Do manufacturers label for lupin?

Due to the frequent use of lupin in European and Australian packaged goods, coupled with reports of allergic reaction, manufacturers in the European Union are required to label for lupin. But this requirement is voluntary in places like the United States, Canada, Australia and other parts of the world where you may find lupin listed among other ingredients without special emphasis. U.S. laws and regulations only require labeling to highlight the Top 8 allergens.

Those allergic to lupin or unsure should be careful of unlabeled, over-the-counter baked goods like pastries sold at a bakery, bread rolls served at a restaurant or beer at a local pub.

 

Other names for lupin are:

  • Lupin Bean/Flour
  • Lupine Bean/Flour
  • Lupin Seed
  • Lupini
  • Termes
  • Altramuz
  • Tarwi
  • Termos

While lupin is currently popular in Europe, its presence is increasing in the United States and elsewhere. As the demand for gluten-free and other free-from goods grows, so may the use of lupin.

If you are concerned you may be allergic to lupin, speak to your board-certified allergist to discuss level of risk, testing and prevention strategies. Avoiding the allergen is the only way to prevent an allergic reaction.

 

 

 

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Vacationing and Staycationing with Food Allergies March 13, 2013

It’s that time of year and not a moment too soon:  Spring Break is upon us!

 

Whether you’re traveling near or far, there are a few things you should do to make sure your spring break is exciting and safe.

 

 

Staying close to home doesn’t mean you can’t shake up your routine.  Explore that neighborhood you’ve been meaning to check out, visit a museum, wander an outdoor market…  But before you go, you may want to do a little prep work:

1.  Sometimes it’s the museum closest to you that’s the hardest to visit.  If you’re heading to a museum, theme park, theater or zoo, you may wish to do some prep work.  These venues often have limited nutritional options, waitstaff often cannot track down ingredients in their high-paced and sometimes chaotic environment and the safety of their menu cannot be guaranteed.  Compound that with a picky eater and you could have a fun-ruining meltdown on your hands.  So, before you go, stick one or two of your child’s favorite dry snack in your bag along with those EpiPens – just in case.

 

2.  Ditto for outdoor markets.  Unless you’re going to a farmers market or pick-your-own farm, it’s often impossible to rely on the cart or truck vendors to know a full ingredient list and/or guarantee that their food is safely prepared without cross contamination.  So, again, plan on eating just before your visit to that flea market and, again, bring treats for the kids.

 

3.  If you’re taking your kids to a new section of town, you’ll want to scope out an eatery nearby that is likely to be safe.  Regardless of whether or not you intend to have a meal while out, it’s always a good idea to be prepared for more fun (or random bouts of hunger).  Check out the options online (including menus) and make a phone call or two to ensure that something can be safely prepared just in case a meltdown occurs.

 

4.  Some of the fun of staycationing is mixing up your routine!   So, try having some dairy-free sorbet for breakfast (see a list of local places right here at Allergy Shmallergy).  Have a gluten-free picnic in the park.  Eat that nut-free dinner under a tent in the family room.  Fun and safety can go together very simply and easily!

 

If you’re going out of town:

1.  Be sure to pack your emergency on-the-go pack in your carry-on.  EpiPens are perfectly acceptable going through security.  And, be sure to include baby wipes to wipe down tray tables and arm rests on airplanes that serve nuts, if you are allergic.

 

2.  Again, pack snacks.  You can buy a drink at the airport but safe meals are more difficult to come by.  Not only is it sometimes a challenge to find FA safe meals at the airport, but getting information to ensure that they don’t contain allergens and are, in fact, safely prepared can be next to impossible.  Snacks will tide you over until you reach your destination.

 

3.  Airline meals and snacks may not be safe. Call the airline and ask them about their allergen policy.   For FA kids, it might be easier to feed them at the airport or bring a bagel or sandwich in addition to snacks onboard for long flights.

 

4.  If you’re traveling abroad, do a little research about how food is typically prepared.  In parts of Asia, soy sauce (which contains not only soy but also wheat) is commonly added to dishes.  In the Middle East, sesame seeds are quite popular.

 

5.   Talk to the hotel concierge to find any specialty items you may need.  For us, we contacted our hotel to find out where we could purchase soy milk for my young son while in the Caribbean.  While on the phone with the hotel, ask them to clear the minibar fridge so you can keep any specialty items fresh.

 

6.  Again, if you’re vacationing somewhere where the don’t speak your native language, you’ll want to feel confident that the waitstaff understands your food restrictions.  Try ordering some food allergy translation cards.  These cards, made by a number of wonderful companies, help you communicate your family’s food allergy (and other dietary) restrictions in a foreign language.  Encourage waitstaff to take the cards back into the kitchen so that chefs themselves can understand the parameters and make appropriate adjustments.

 

7.  Finally, arrive prepared.  When going abroad, our research indicated it might be tough to easily find a whole allergy-free breakfast for my FA son.  While we could order fruit, everything else offered at the resort seemed to conflict with his allergies.  So, we packed a bag filled with convenient breakfast food like small cereal boxes, raisins, and oatmeal.  He could have a head start to breakfast in our room while we got ready and snack on fruit, etc at the restaurant table.  Plus, we could use the empty bag to haul our souvenirs home.  A win-win!

 

The key to a successful spring break is relaxation.  So no matter what form that takes, use the above steps to ensure that a food allergic reaction doesn’t hamper your fun.