Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Food Allergy Resolutions January 7, 2020

photo of fireworks

Photo by Anna-Louise on Pexels.com

Happy New Year!

 

Each new year brings the hope of getting things right, of bettering ourselves.  When we set new year’s resolutions, we often seek self-improvement, time for personal passions, valuable social interaction, travel and adventure.

 

For those with food allergies, a key component to all of those resolutions is sticking to good food allergy management practices.  There’s nothing you can’t do with food allergies, but you need to make sure you’re safe and prepared when you do it!

 

Setting small achievable goals will help reset your habits and keep you safe as you pursue your dreams.  Here are some food allergy resolutions we ALL should keep this year:

 

Auvi-q and Epipen

1. Always carry 2 epinephrine auto-injectors.  There are many varieties on the market today in all shapes and sizes.  Find one that fits your lifestyle and carry it with you everywhere (yes, everywhere).  This may take some creativity, but it’s critical because early use of epinephrine is shown to save lives and reduce complication at the hospital.

 

Symptoms of Severe reaction

2. Know the signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction.  A severe allergic reaction, called anaphylaxis (ANA-FIL-AXIS) can be VERY SERIOUS and even fatal.  That’s why it’s key to know the signs of a reaction and to know what to do in the first few minutes.  The Language of a Food Allergic Reaction outlines both the symptoms as well as how a young child might describe them.

 

 

ingredient list - flickr mia

photo credit: mia! via Flickr, creative commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)

3. Know the labeling laws. Food manufacturers are required to label for the Top 8 allergens – these are responsible for 90% of all allergic reactions.  But they are not required to label for cross-contamination or any allergen outside of the Top 8.  Are your allergens in that list?  What else should you know?  The Ins and Outs of Reading Food Labels is critical to help you make safe decisions for yourself and your family.

 

 

three women sitting on grass

Photo by Luis Quintero on Pexels.com

4. Teach ONE person how (and when!) to use an epinephrine auto-injector.  Food allergies are a growing problem.  Statistically, 2 kids in every classroom have them. So do 1 in 10 adults.  We either know someone with a food allergy or we are allergic ourselves.  To protect patients and create food allergy allies, let’s teach one friend or family member (who doesn’t yet know) how to use an auto-injector.  Let them use a trainer if you have one – this will empower them should they need to use the real thing in an emergency.  Even elementary school kids can recognize symptoms of an allergic reaction and be taught to get an adult or nurse and call 911.  It’s easy!

 

 

photo of a man jumping high

Photo by Joshua Woroniecki on Pexels.com

Send us your new year’s resolutions!  We love to hear what kinds of wonderful and exciting things you have your sights set on!

 

 

 

Donate These Allergy-Friendly Foods This Holiday Season November 25, 2019

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Happy Thanksgiving!

 

There is so much to be grateful for this holiday season – family, friends, and good health among so many other things to be thankful for.  But some families are struggling, worried about where they will get their next meal.  When you add food allergies to their list of concerns, their situation goes from difficult to dire.

 

Food banks and food pantries will be feeding families through the holiday season and throughout the year.  And, reflective of the prevalence across the United States, 1 in every 10 adults and 1 in every 13 kids that uses these services will have a food allergy.  Many will not list their food allergy, as food allergies often go undiagnosed.  But obtaining a ingredients to make a safe meal will not be easy.

 

If you donate to food banks or food pantries this season, please consider donating some of these much needed, shelf-stable items for clients with food allergies:

  • Gluten-free bread (shelf-stable, unrefrigerated)
  • Soy, Rice and Almond-Milk (shelf stable, unrefrigerated)
  • Gluten and nut-free cereals
  • Sunbutter, Soynut butter, and almond butter
  • Nut-free granola bars (such as Enjoy Life, Made Good, etc)
  • Gluten-free pasta and GF pasta meals
  • Soy-free cooking oil (such as canola, olive, etc)

 

Stock the Shelves for Families with Food Allergies - the easy way to increase food allergy-friendly items at food pantries and brighten the lives of families across the U.S. Host a food drive today! shmallergy.wordpress.com

 

In-Flight Free-From Meals – Airlines Addressing Dietary Restrictions August 29, 2018

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If you’re taking to the air soon, you may be pleased to be able to request a special meal from your air carrier.  Airlines all over the world are responding to calls for special meals ranging from low-sodium and halal (made without pork or alcohol) to gluten-free.

 

Requests for special meals have increased over the years.  Historically, passengers have asked for specific meals for medical reasons or those that adhere to their belief system.  Experts wonder if the number of requests has increased because of the popularity of certain diets or the idea that special meals may be healthier or better tasting than those regularly served.  While that remains to be seen, the willingness to offer such meals is uplifting to patients with food allergies.

 

Both domestic and international travelers can take advantage of special orders covering a wide range of meal choices, but which ones your airline offers will vary from carrier to carrier, ticket type and destination.

 

Here’s a sampling of available allergy-friendly meals by airline.  As you will see, the meals Click on each airline to be directed to their site more details, including their policies on nuts and other allergens.

 

in-flight-meal-732953_1920 thank_you

 

Domestic Flights:

 

American Airlines

Glutose-Intolerant

Lactose-Intolerant

Vegan

 

Delta Airlines

Gluten-free

Vegetarian

 

United 

Vegetarian

Gluten-Intolerant

United policy for passengers with food allergies

 

 

International Carriers:

 

ANA

Allergen-Free Meals (choice between the 7 Allergen Free Meal and the 27 Allergen Free Meal)

7 Allergen Free Meal for Children

Gluten-Friendly

Low-Lactose

Seafood Meal (does not contain meat)

 

British Airways

various Vegetarian Meals

Gluten Intolerant

Low Lactose

 

JAL 

Gluten-Free

Vegetarian

Seafood Meal

Minimal Allergen Menu Meals

 

Luftansa

Gluten-Intolerant

Lactose-Intolerant

Vegan

Vegetarian

 

Malaysia Airlines

Gluten-Intolerant

Low Lactose

Vegan

various Vegetarian Meals

Seafood Meal

Special Meals

 

Qatar Airways

Gluten-Free

Non-Lactose

various Vegetarian Meals (also excludes fish, seafood, eggs and dairy)

 

Singapore Air

various Vegetarian Meals

Vegan

Gluten Intolerant

Low Lactose

Non-Strict Nut Free Meal

 

Turkish Airlines

various Vegetarian Meals (also excludes fish, seafood, eggs and dairy)

Gluten-Free

Low-Lactose

 

 

Please comment below if you’ve had one of these meals and let us know how it was!

 

Allergy-Friendly Thanksgiving Recipes November 20, 2017

It’s actually fairly easy to create a Thanksgiving dinner that everyone can enjoy easily.  With just a couple of ingredient swaps, there’s almost no part of this inclusive meal that you’ll need to omit!  Try some of the below, post a photo and let me know how it all turns out!

 

MASHED POTATOES

You’ll Never Miss It Dairy-Free Mashed Potatoes (via Allergy Shmallergy)

By using broth and dairy-free butter instead of buttermilk, these mashed potatoes turn out savory and delicious – right down to the last lick on your fork.  My guests have always loved this recipe!

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MUSHROOM GRAVY

Pacific Foods Organic Vegan Mushroom Gravy

Available at local supermarkets, this gravy is both dairy and egg-free.  Another thing it has going for it?  You don’t need to prepare it!  **This gravy DOES contain almonds (almond butter) – please avoid if you are allergic to tree nuts!**

Pacific Foods Organic Vegan Gravy

 

CREAM OF MUSHROOM SOUP/GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE

Did you know you can make your own dairy-free (and gluten-free) cream of mushroom soup?  Why is this important?  Because cream of mushroom soup is the base for delicious green bean casserole!

 

The Kitchen Girl blog posted an easy recipe for Can’t Believe It’s Vegan Cream of Mushroom Soup.  Her recipe uses unsweetened almond milk; but if you’re allergic to tree nuts (as we are) you could substitute that for unsweetened soy milk or rice milk.  And, as a bonus, her soup is also gluten-free.  Looks DELICIOUS!

 

The magazine Gluten-Free & More posted a recipe for Dairy-free, Gluten-free Green Bean Casserole.  It involves creating your own gluten-free breaded onions to top the dish – just like the original recipe.  Those onions are my favorite part – I’d double this part of the recipe for my table!

 

STUFFING

The big obstacle for allergy-friendly stuffing?  Gluten!  Those pesky bread cubes make it a tough sell for those with a wheat allergy or celiac disease.  Enter Williams-Sonoma: they carry Mariposa Baking Co. Gluten-Free Cornbread Stuffing.  This rosemary and sage version contains egg and soy (and is manufactured in shared equipment with milk), but is gluten-free and pre-packaged.  One less thing to stress about!

 

If you can’t make it to the market, you can also order Three Bakers Herb Gluten-Free Seasoned Whole Grain Cubed Stuffing (contains egg) from Amazon Prime!

 

DESSERT

Dessert is always tricky for those with food allergies.  Holiday desserts are typically filled with butter, egg, gluten and nuts.

 

But these Allergy-Free Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies have (almost) none of those things!  They are easy to make, can feed a crowd, and offer an alternative to make them gluten-free.  They combine the delicious, comfort of a regular chocolate chip cookies with the flavor-du-jour pumpkin spice!

 

Another favorite holiday dessert in our house is Sorbet Pie.  It’s light and refreshing (something much needed after a big, savory dinner) and it’s dairy-free, egg-free, peanut and tree nut-free.  Be sure to give the pie times to refreeze before serving!

 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)

 

Creating a Halloween for EVERYONE October 19, 2017

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Halloween is traditionally frightful.  Between the the ghosts and zombies milling about,  candy and party food shouldn’t be scary.  But the chaotic and exuberant fun of Halloween can be chilling for many families with food allergies.

 

Parents with food allergic children are justified in worrying when their kid comes face to face with his food allergy.  And, candy is full of allergens: dairy, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, corn, egg…  It’s a wonder we survive!

 

Here are a few ways to keep your sanity during the craziest night of the year:

 

  1. Prepare your kids:  Remind them not to eat anything while they are trick-or-treating.  Reading ingredient lists on tiny packages in the dark is challenging (to say the least).  There’s plenty of time to taste test their candy when they get home.
  2.  Go with them to the front door:  Help little ones choose safe candy at the front door.  Your presence is also a good place to reinforce all those lessons on manners while you’re there.
  3. Cash in the allergens: Keep a variety of safe substitute candy or treats at your house.  Offer to trade your child’s unsafe candy for your pre-approved substitutes.  If you’d rather your child ditch most of his candy, The Switch Witch is a fun and magical way to cash his or her candy in for a small gift.

     

  4. Be reminded that sometimes ingredients and/or manufacturing practices change when candy is miniaturized.  Make sure you read ingredient lists of everything, including candy that has been safe in a larger size.
  5. Participate in the Teal Pumpkin Project:  You’re familiar with all those wacky blue pumpkins, right?!  Teal pumpkins mean that house has non-candy treats to offer for food allergic children. Move over orange, teal is the new black!  You can spray paint your own pumpkin or purchase one to reuse, like this one:

     

    • Teal Pumpkin Decoration For Food Allergy Awareness
    6.  Stock toys AS treats:  Instead of candy (or in addition to safe candy), consider stocking fun toys and tattoos.  Even kids might admit that there is a limit to the amount of sugar they can consume and something that will last past Nov. 1st will be fun!  This Halloween set gives you a variety of toys in one order – bonus!

 

  • 156 Piece Mega Halloween Toy Novelty Assortment; 12 Halloween Ducks, 12 Halloween Pencils, 12 Halloween Sticker Sheets; 48 Halloween Erasers; 72 Halloween Glitter Tattoos!!

7.  Don’t leave home without it:  Auto-injectors need to go everywhere with you – including trick-or-treating.  You know they’ll be carrying a bag!  Make sure that your child’s epinephrine auto-injector is in there with a flashlight.

 

8.  Allergy Shmallergy’s list of safe candy:  Sharing a holiday builds community.  Refer your friends and neighbors to Allergy Shmallergy’s list of nut-free candy to truly create an inclusive Halloween that EVERYONE can enjoy!

 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)

 

Fun for Everyone: Candy Bar Birthday Party April 12, 2017

I wish I could take credit for this adorable idea.  But I can’t.  My friend is just a genius.

 

Her own kids aren’t allergic, but my thoughtful and creative friend had kids with food allergies on her mind when she thought about what special treat her daughter could share with ALL of her party guests.  Like my friend, many parents are concerned with how to be inclusive of guests with food allergies.  Sometimes, the best answer is also the simplest.

 

After singing a rowdy chorus of “Happy Birthday” to our favorite 7 year old, the kids were each given a festive party bag that they could fill with any (or ALL) of their favorite candy.  Best of all, everything was dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free and most was also gluten-free.  There’s nothing that makes a child happier than being included in on the fun!

 

Plus, no goodie bag needed!  The kids all got to bring their loot home.  HUGE bonus in my opinion!

 

If you’re going to replicate this fantastic idea, I would recommend a few things:

  1.  Check Allergy Shmallergy’s Safe List of Nut-Free Candy page.  This is not a comprehensive list.  And, it doesn’t account for other allergies.  But you’ll find that many of the candies listed are also dairy-free, egg-free and gluten-free.  Read ingredient lists carefully and if you have any doubts of an item’s safety, snap a photo and email the child’s parent to verify.
  2. Save ingredient lists and bring them to the party.  If anything needs to be double-checked, you’ll have all your information at hand.
  3. Be careful when serving similar looking items (like M&Ms and Skittles).  Not only is chance of cross-contamination a concern with unwrapped candy, but I’ve seen unsafe candy fall into safe candy bowls.  For the purposes of a party, I would stick to the idea that “everything on the table is safe for party guests” principle.

 

Look at this fun, inviting table set up!
Looking for containers and scoops like the ones above?

Set of 12 Clear Plastic Candy Scoops

Penny Candy Jars (set of 2)

Amcan Scalloped Container, Large

Vista Premium Quality Plastic 10″ Serving Bowl (set of 2)


  
Smarties.  A classic!


Caught red handed!  My son and his best friend/brother of the birthday girl.

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

6 Tips for Traveling with Food Allergies March 7, 2017

pool-690034_1920 via pixabay

 

Spring break is on the horizon!  Can you smell the fresh air already?  Are you mentally packing your bags? (I am!)

 

Here are a few tips when traveling with food allergies:

locking-knob-883059_1920 via pixabay

  1.  Call your airline and inquire about their food allergy policy in advance.  Ask specifically about early boarding and in-flight announcements.
  2. Most airlines will allow passengers to board the plane early in order to wipe down surfaces (this includes seat backs, seat belts, tray tables and knobs, armrests). Be sure to bring enough baby wipes or antibacterial wipes (such as Wet Ones) to cover all the legs of your travel.  Again, ask about pre-boarding at the gate.
  3. Carry your epinephrine auto-injectors and antihistamines ON BOARD.  Do not pack these away in your luggage.  [*ALLERGY SHMALLERGY TIP*: Zyrtec makes dissolvable tablets which eliminate the worry over bringing liquids through security as well as anything spilling in your bags.]
  4. If you’re traveling to a warm weather destination, you’ll need to remember to keep your epinephrine auto-injectors at room temperature – even while enjoying the beach or pool.  Pack a cool pack (like this one) and an insulated bag (like this cute lunch bag).  Store the cool packs in your hotel’s mini-fridge (who needs a $15 bag of M&Ms anyway!?) or plan on ordering a to-go cup of ice to keep the medicine cool poolside.
  5. A hotel or resort’s food services manager can usually help you navigate menus.  On our last vacation, the food services manager had food allergies himself and was invaluable in hunting down ingredients and safe alternatives for our family.  Befriend this fantastic person!
  6. If you’re planning on visiting an amusement park, taking a hike or being similarly active, consider packing a backpack into your luggage (or use one as your carry-on!).  You’ll need to bring your epinephrine auto-injectors wherever you go – especially on vacation when you’re away from home cooking, familiar restaurants and local knowledge of hospitals and doctors.  Backpacks can make carrying it easier depending on the activity – simply slip the insulated bag into your backpack and go!

 

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Two more notes:

  • Airline travelers should bring their own snacks/meals on board flights to ensure their safety.
  • Refrain from using airplane blankets and pillows as allergen residue may reside there.
  • Bring a baby or antibacterial wipe to the bathroom to wipe down door  and knob handles.

 

 

 

MLK Day: Inclusion and Action January 13, 2017

Filed under: Advocacy,Uncategorized — malawer @ 12:01 am
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One week ago, I found myself chaperoning a large group of 6th graders on a field trip to the National Cathedral.  You could tell right away we had a great guide.  She was 84 years old and wore a headset microphone that was clearly turned off but still commanded the kids total attention.  A former educator, she wasn’t just a teacher (and a student) of history.  She was part of it.  She lived it.  She was woven into story after story about the cathedral and its visitors.  As our guide led us to the pulpit where Martin Luther King, Jr gave his last sermon, she described the mood of the sermon as solemn – almost as if he knew he may not make it. And, she would know.  She sat and listened only a few feet from the man himself.

 

mlk-wikipedia

 

As we approach Martin Luther King Jr. Day, there are two things that stand out on my mind.  Two things that are universally important – but especially critical to food allergy families whose worlds are fraught with uncertainty.

 

The first is INCLUSION.  The effort of inclusion is an act of kindness and humanity.  Everyone wants to be welcomed by their peers, their parents, the people around them. Inclusion is an act of thoughtfulness.  So much of coming together involves food:  in times of happiness and celebration, sadness and consolation.  Food is a hallmark of society, tradition and culture.  When we don’t make accommodations to include a member of our group, we’re sending a message that they are not a valued member of our society.

 

I know I’m preaching to the choir here.  As food allergy parents and those with food allergies ourselves, I know you understand.  It nearly brings me to tears of appreciation when someone goes the extra mile to include my son – even in the smallest way.   It’s not lost on him either.  He feels seen, validated.

 

Efforts of inclusion, of focusing on ways to connect with each other, is more important today than it’s ever been.

 

The other sentiment that keeps circling around my brain is ACTION.  If we want to improve life for us and our kids, we need to live actively.  The path to a better, more understanding community is involvement.  While we wait for extended family, friends, peers, teachers, and school administrators to understand and support the needs of our particular community, let’s connect with one another and actively help each other out.  When you’re sending in a birthday snack, call the other food allergy parent in the classroom and find out if your snack is safe for their child.  Decorate the peanut-free table and make it THE place to sit in the cafeteria.  Talk to your child about what to do if they see a friend having a food allergy reaction.  Help educate a friend who recently received a food allergy diagnosis.  Check in with them and let them know you’re there to vent frustrations to and to celebrate victories with.

 

Martin Luther King Jr. once said,“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: ‘What are you doing for others?'”  This is why we celebrate the memory and influence of Dr. King by engaging in service.  When my kids are involved in being charitable with their time and creative with their energy while helping others, they take ownership of and are active participants in their community.  Their world becomes less uncertain and more able to be shaped by their direct actions.  Let’s be inclusive of one another.  Let’s be kind and supportive of each other.  Maybe others will pay that kindness forward.  And, maybe, just maybe, that kindness will find its way back to you.

 

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Photo taken by Sharon & Nikki McCutcheon

 

 

 

Focus on Fun: Thanksgiving Games November 17, 2016


Thanksgiving and other food-centric holidays are tough for families with food allergies.  Traditional foods may not be safe and allergic family members sometimes feel excluded from the celebration.

 

Time to interject fun, family traditions that won’t fill you up and are cross-contamination free-guaranteed!

 

One of my favorite ways to do this is to have the kids go on a scavenger hunt.  If you have a small group dining, the hunt could be for objects in the house or yard.  If you have a large group, the hunt could be for answers to questions from family and friends.  [See attached.]

 

Download here:

Focus on Fun – Thanksgiving Scavenger Hunts

 

Pinterest also has a ton of Thanksgiving crafts that kids can complete while watching the Thanksgiving Day Parade and waiting for the turkey.  The art work could decorate the dinner table or the dining room!  This is a great way to get food allergic kids involved with the meal without worry about allergens.

 

Perfect for indoor or out!  Download the ready-made Thanksgiving Scavenger Hunt here:

Focus on Fun – Thanksgiving Scavenger Hunts

 

Day of the Dead Halloween Party October 25, 2016

Disclaimer: Allergy Shmallergy received these goods in exchange for an honest review.  I only feature products that I use myself and believe would be useful to the food allergy community.

2016-10-25-14-17-32

Trick or Treat banner from Oriental Trading

 

 

Halloween is almost here!  I hope you are all busy painting and decorating your teal pumpkins.  Teal pumpkins are a great way to let food allergy families know that you support them by offering non-food treats.  And by now, you all know that Oriental Trading has an enormous selection of non-food treats to fill your Halloween buckets.  These trick-or-treat items have a huge impact on kids with food allergies who often cannot collect almost any candy.  Food allergic kids can feel very left out at Halloween which is why it’s important to find ways for everyone to have fun safely.

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My middle son sporting a pair of glow in the dark vampire fangs…

[Oriental Trading supports the Teal Pumpkin project.  Check out their Halloween selection here.]

 

And, don’t forget to check their coupon page (you never know!):  Oriental Trading Coupon & Promo Page

 

We have a tradition of hosting an annual Halloween party at our house.  I began this as a way of ensuring that my son had plenty to eat and lots to celebrate when he was a young trick-or-treater.  Initially, he was allergic to so many foods that I couldn’t find a single candy he could enjoy safely.

 

I’m happy to report that he has since outgrown a few allergies.  Most candy is still off limits to him.  But surrounded by great friends at a pre-trick-or-treat dinner and post-candy-swap, he doesn’t mind.   Every year, the party grows and grows to include more families and more fun!

 

This year, I’ve create a Day of the Dead themed Halloween table.

halloween-middle-table

The playful patterns and colorful sugar skulls dress up any table.  Check out the cups!

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I couldn’t resist these plates and napkins – so I infused a little of the traditional Halloween with the addition of these irresistible black and white plates and napkins.

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Just like an outfit, accessories can make a table.  This sugar skull bowl and small skulls were a great addition to the black and whites at play.

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Are you looking at this table runner?!  You can’t quite tell from the photos, but it has spiders at the center of the webs and glitters in the light.  And, that pumpkin?!  I’ll be using it on my table through Thanksgiving!

 

 

I also picked out this silicone mold – which can be used for ice or to dress up snacks!

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Here’s a list of the items I used to create my Day of the Dead Halloween table:

 

Day of the Dead Candy Dish

Glittered Spider Table Runner

Foam Orange Pumpkin

Skull & Crossbones Ice Cube Tray

Skulls

“Trick or Treat” Halloween Cardboard Pennant Banner

Spider Web Dinner Plates

Large Polka Dots Dessert Plates

Boo Beverage Napkins

Day of the Dead Disposable Cups

Glow-in-the-Dark Vampire Teeth

Colorful Halloween Spider Rings

Day of the Dead Skull Wall Decoration

 

 

Now that the table – and the mood – are set, stay tuned later this week to see what I’m serving!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Little More Halloween Magic with The Switch Witch October 19, 2015

Let’s face it:  candy makes Halloween magical for most kids.  As a kid, when else do your parents let you go out after dark and collect candy from your neighbors?  It’s heaven!

Unless you have food allergies.  And then it’s fraught with danger and uncertainty.  Not only is candy laden with dairy and nuts, but wheat, soy and eggs are all potential pitfalls for families with food allergies.  Ingredient lists are often missing – or extremely hard to read – on small, packaged candy.  And what may be safe to eat in a larger size is sometimes no longer safe when miniaturized due to manufacturing practices. Even when candy does not contain a particular allergen, it’s often processed on equipment that poses a risk.

Nothing is more fun-ending for a kid than realizing most of your candy isn’t safe to enjoy – except, of course, having a food allergy reaction.  There have been many years when my son’s “Trade” pile was larger than his “Keep.”

Switch Witch

Enter The Switch Witch (Storybook only, available from Amazon).  At bedtime on Halloween night, tired and over-sugared kids can leave a heap of their Halloween candy out with their Switch Witch doll.  While they’re sleeping, the Switch Witch trades their stash for a special gift.  It’s brilliant!  Whether, like us, you have a child with food allergies whose Halloween candy isn’t safe for him or -also like us- your kids are just super-stellar candy collectors who have amassed way too much unhealthy sugar, the Switch Witch extends the excitement of Halloween.  This is a great way for food allergic children to have fun trick-or-treating, knowing that their milk and nut-filled loot will be traded for a satisfying surprise.

I’m getting on board this craze now!  It’s sure to be fun for ALL my kids.

[I feel like I need to say it for the record, but I get nothing from the genius that is Switch Witch.  This is not a sponsored post.  There are affiliate links within the article – a portion of which will benefit AllergyStrong, an organization that supports at-risk and low income families with food allergies.  Thank you and enjoy!]

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Sweet Surprise Cake Cookie Sandwiches (Nut-Free) April 10, 2015

You guys already know this:  Desserts are tough to rely on for people with food allergies.  The typical bakery will almost never guarantee that your dessert doesn’t contain or hasn’t been cross contaminated with nuts and most are made with dairy, eggs, wheat, and even corn and soy.

So, every couple of weeks, I would spend an afternoon baking and frosting cupcakes for my son to bring with him to birthday parties, class celebrations, and dinners out.  Sometimes, he’d have the occasion to gobble up a whole batch (minus a few for Dad) before I could even freeze a few!  But I began noticing he wasn’t really eating the cake part.  Which started making my labor of love a lot less lovely.

“Yeah, Mom….” he began one day, “I don’t really like the cake part.”  I thought I would die.  Do you know how much time I had been spending baking cupcakes?!

Turns out he was just using the cupcakes for the frosting.  So, I had to find a new vehicle to get frosting into that kid’s mouth (but ONLY for special occasions, much to his dismay!).  Thus the Cookie Sandwich was born!  At first I used store bought cookies (influenced by my son’s inexplicable objection to my baking).  As they are, they are a humungous hit when I send them into school for both my boys’ birthdays.  And, it’s embarrassing when moms ask for the recipe because it’s so insanely simple.  But this week, the Cookie Sandwich has been upgraded.

Meet the soft, perfectly proportioned, Sweet Surprise Cake Cookie Sandwich:

 

And, may I point out that it’s frosting to cake ratio is ideal!  It’s just simple math.  These are perfect for taking with you to birthday parties, serving as class treats, and offering to guests.  I made them for my husband’s birthday this week and plan on making more for a May Day celebration.

Here’s how to begin (based on a suggestions from the Betty Crocker site):

1 box cake mix (I used Betty Crocker’s Rainbow Chip Super Moist Mix)

1/2 cup butter, melted

1 Tbsp milk

1 egg

1 can frosting

Heat oven to 350 degrees.  Mix all ingredients together until soft batter forms.  Scoop onto ungreased baking sheet.  Bake for 8-10 minutes.

[Tip:  You want to remove the cookies from the oven before they begin to turn golden.  I took mine out at 8 minutes sharp.]

Cool completely.  Frost generously on the bottom of one cookie and top with the bottom of another.  Serves 12.

Notes:  I use Pillsbury frosting because it is dairy-free (a holdover from when my son was very allergic to dairy).  Although this recipe isn’t dairy free, I’m certain it would be delicious using dairy-free butter and very vanilla soy milk in lieu of regular.  As is, it’s good for kids who are approved to incorporate baked milk products into their diet.

Optional:  I liked mine with the sprinkles IN the cookie, but you would use another cake mix and roll the frosted cookies in sprinkles, chocolate chips or nonpareils to mix things up!

Quick someone get me a napkin, I’m salivating from TYPING about them!

 

 
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