Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Essential Items for Families with Food Allergies – Portable Food Carriers March 28, 2017

Filed under: Parent Sanity — malawer @ 11:00 am
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Food allergy parents are accustomed to prepping safe food at home and taking it on-the-go to parties, school functions, and family gatherings.  Here are a few items that might make carrying safe food just a little easier!

 

Portable Slice of Pizza or Pie?

 

Take a gluten-free or dairy-free slice of pizza to a party?  Who knew there was a container just for that purpose?!  This Brick Oven Pizza Saver looks like it’s perfectly sized to transport both pizza and maybe even a slice of cookie cake or pie!

Brick oven slice saver

 

 

Individual Cupcake Holders:

 

Both this reusable (by Fox Run) and these disposable cupcake holders (both via Amazon) are the PERFECT container to tote a peanut-free, dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free cupcake to a birthday party!

 

Fox Run Cupcake Holder

Cupcake Supply Co Indiv Cupcake holder

 

Removable Labels:

When sending your child with a safe snack or special treat – OR when labeling your own lunch at the office – the best way to ensure it doesn’t get mixed up with someone else’s is to clearly label it.  These removable labels by Avery do just the trick:

Avery Labels

 

Hot Lunch!

 

If your kids are itching for a hot lunch, but school lunches aren’t a safe option, then you absolutely need a thermos that will keep your meal warm for up to 5 hours and fit neatly into your lunchbox or work bag.

 

Thermos

 

And, while you’re packing your lunchbox, why not add Sistema’s four-piece cutlery set.  It connects handles to fork, spoon, kid friendly-knife and chopsticks – making it a synch to grab on-the-go.

Sistema Klipo

 

For Safe Restaurant Dining:

 

If you’re allergic to soy, you’ve probably already toted salad dressing to restaurants.  Allergic to gluten/wheat, I’d bet you’ve stashed tamari in your purse as you meet friends for sushi.  OXO Good Grips On-The-Go Silicone Squeeze Bottles allow you to do just that in a small, spill-free way!

OXO Squeeze containers

 

We want to hear from you!  What other items do you find useful for living with your food allergies? 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

6 Sensational Books for Kids with Food Allergies December 19, 2016

The holidays are just days away!  Try giving a book that a family with food allergies will treasure.  Or, donate a book to your child’s classroom or school library!

 

Despite the growing number of cases, food allergic kids often feel alone with their allergy. It is so important for kids with food allergies to see this aspect of themselves reflected in literature and elsewhere.  Plus, these books are great teaching tools for both a child with a food allergy as well as their siblings and classmates!

 

1.The Bugabees – Friends with Food Allergies, by Amy Recob
Ages: preschool – 7
bugabees-book
Beautifully and colorfully illustrated, The Bugabees is a story about eight insect friends who each have one of the different Top 8 food allergies.  They talk about their need to stay away from various treats and lightly touch on allergic symptoms they might experience.  Importantly, the bugs each repeat a mantra for kids with food allergies which reinforces that they can have fun without their allergen!  My daughter immediately noted that her brother has food allergies and was singing along with their rhythmic mantra by the end!

 

bugybops-book

2.  The BugyBops – Friends for All Time is the sequel in which the Bugabees friends learn about why their friends avoid certain foods, what an EpiPen is and why it’s important, and what they can do to keep their friends safe.  This is a fantastic companion book to The Bugabees!  I would highly recommend for a classroom visit and school library.
Ages: preschool – 8

 

3. Joey Panda and His Food Allergies Save the Day: A Children’s Book, by Amishi S. Murthy, MD and Vivian Chou, MD
Ages: Preschool – 8
joey-panda-book

Written by two pediatric allergists, the story of Joey Panda – a kid with multiple food allergies who is nervous about his first day of school, a situation that many food allergy families face.  To Joey’s surprise, not only does he find out that many of his new friends are already familiar with food allergies but that he has the knowledge and power to become a superstar.  This is story that acknowledges a child’s fears about going to a new school with food allergies and turns it into a story of empowerment.  Just the kind I love!

 

4.  The Peanut Pickle, A Story About Peanut Allergy, by Jessica Jacobs
Ages: 3-8

peanut-pickle-book

Ben has a peanut allergy.  Sometimes he finds it hard to talk about.  But now that he’s six, he’s finding ways to tell family and friends about his food allergy.  Kids with food allergies will recognize themselves in Ben and the situations he faces – important for children who often feel alone with their allergy.  This is a great book for your child to practice what to say to keep him or herself safe.

 

5.  The Princess and the Peanut Allergy, by Wendy McClure
Ages: 5-9
The Princess and the Peanut Allergy

Centered around two best friends, Paula and Regina.  Regina wants a nut-laden cake for her birthday.  Her friend, Paula is allergic to peanuts – causing problems for them both.  The girls have an argument that is ultimately resolved when Regina realizes that having her nut-filled cake may compromise her friendship with Paula.  And, Regina surprises her friend by ordering her birthday cake nut-free.  The princess and pea analogy used to enlighten Regina works as a way of explaining that even the smallest bit of peanut could be extremely harmful to someone who is allergic to them.  Importantly, the book addresses some of the social issues that can arise from having a food allergy and helps articulate conflict resolution in an age-appropriate way.

 

6.  The Peanut-Free Cafe, by Gloria Koster
Ages: 5-9Grant is a new student at the Nutley School – where everyone enjoys PB&J at lunch. As a result, he’s forced to eat by himself at a peanut-free table.  In an effort get to know him, the school offers an irresistible peanut-free cafe for anyone willing to give up their peanut butter.  This story is clever and the idea of a creating a peanut-free cafe at our house and at his school greatly excited my son!

 

 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)

 

Day of the Dead Halloween Party October 25, 2016

Disclaimer: Allergy Shmallergy received these goods in exchange for an honest review.  I only feature products that I use myself and believe would be useful to the food allergy community.

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Trick or Treat banner from Oriental Trading

 

 

Halloween is almost here!  I hope you are all busy painting and decorating your teal pumpkins.  Teal pumpkins are a great way to let food allergy families know that you support them by offering non-food treats.  And by now, you all know that Oriental Trading has an enormous selection of non-food treats to fill your Halloween buckets.  These trick-or-treat items have a huge impact on kids with food allergies who often cannot collect almost any candy.  Food allergic kids can feel very left out at Halloween which is why it’s important to find ways for everyone to have fun safely.

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My middle son sporting a pair of glow in the dark vampire fangs…

[Oriental Trading supports the Teal Pumpkin project.  Check out their Halloween selection here.]

 

And, don’t forget to check their coupon page (you never know!):  Oriental Trading Coupon & Promo Page

 

We have a tradition of hosting an annual Halloween party at our house.  I began this as a way of ensuring that my son had plenty to eat and lots to celebrate when he was a young trick-or-treater.  Initially, he was allergic to so many foods that I couldn’t find a single candy he could enjoy safely.

 

I’m happy to report that he has since outgrown a few allergies.  Most candy is still off limits to him.  But surrounded by great friends at a pre-trick-or-treat dinner and post-candy-swap, he doesn’t mind.   Every year, the party grows and grows to include more families and more fun!

 

This year, I’ve create a Day of the Dead themed Halloween table.

halloween-middle-table

The playful patterns and colorful sugar skulls dress up any table.  Check out the cups!

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I couldn’t resist these plates and napkins – so I infused a little of the traditional Halloween with the addition of these irresistible black and white plates and napkins.

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Just like an outfit, accessories can make a table.  This sugar skull bowl and small skulls were a great addition to the black and whites at play.

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Are you looking at this table runner?!  You can’t quite tell from the photos, but it has spiders at the center of the webs and glitters in the light.  And, that pumpkin?!  I’ll be using it on my table through Thanksgiving!

 

 

I also picked out this silicone mold – which can be used for ice or to dress up snacks!

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Here’s a list of the items I used to create my Day of the Dead Halloween table:

 

Day of the Dead Candy Dish

Glittered Spider Table Runner

Foam Orange Pumpkin

Skull & Crossbones Ice Cube Tray

Skulls

“Trick or Treat” Halloween Cardboard Pennant Banner

Spider Web Dinner Plates

Large Polka Dots Dessert Plates

Boo Beverage Napkins

Day of the Dead Disposable Cups

Glow-in-the-Dark Vampire Teeth

Colorful Halloween Spider Rings

Day of the Dead Skull Wall Decoration

 

 

Now that the table – and the mood – are set, stay tuned later this week to see what I’m serving!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food Allergies and The School Lunch November 17, 2013

I can hardly believe I’m able to write about this.  I never thought that my son would be able to participate in any school lunch program.  He entered Kindergarten allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, sesame seeds, eggs and dairy.  Amazingly, in close collaboration with our allergist, my son outgrew that latter two.

 

We rejoiced when he most recently outgrew dairy.  Our family happily made a list of all the foods he could now taste.  And, suddenly, we realized that he might be able to sign up for our school’s hot lunch program – a program he had been hoping to try.

 

Like many schools, our hot lunch program is entirely nut-free.  That came as a huge relief.  But sesame seed allergies are tricky.  And, I would have to do a lot of research to ensure the meals were still safe for my son before signing him up.

 

I first went online to our school’s internal website.  I was pleasantly surprised to find the lunch schedule mapped out from September until winter break.  And when I scrolled on each dish on the menu, I was even more surprised to see the ingredient lists pop up.  What luck!  I made some notes on a few meals where questions remained (such as ingredients in hamburger buns, oil used to fry falafel, additional information needed in various seasoning mixes) and contacted the school to get answers.

 

The Director of Food Services at the school was amazing!  When I contacted him, he immediately made time for us to sit down in the kitchen and gather additional information.  He demonstrated great understanding of food allergies and was patient as we plodded through his kitchen reading the ingredient lists of bottles and packages.  We made a final list of questions he needed to follow up on with his suppliers and I left with a sense of confidence (and awe) that my son could try hot lunches.

 

As it turns out, there are three meals that my son can’t eat:  Falafel (they’re baked not fried, but the mix contained sesame seed oil) and two Asian-inspired dishes.  Thankfully, the cafeteria always serves two main dishes each day, so my son can choose the other on days when one of the above forbidden meals are offered.

 

How has he liked it?  Pretty good!

  • He’s 8, active and growing.  So, he’s HUNGRY at lunch.  He loves that he can eat a hardy meal and go back for seconds.
  • He enjoys the variety:  rotisserie chicken one day, italian sausage and peppers the next, chicken fajitas a third.
  • Plus, it’s hot:  roasted potatoes and meatball subs taste way better warm!
  • I love that he tries new things all the time.  Not only does he only have limited options for a main dish, but watching his friends chow down on something new, like jerk pork chop, intrigues him into giving it a fair shot.
  • And, I’d be lying if I didn’t say that it’s certainly easier for both of us in the morning!
 

I was biting my nails with anxiety the first day of hot lunch.  Although I had checked and read the packaging, I was still nervous about him embarking on this great, big step.  But he came home thrilled – and proud!  And I love that kind of confidence and hope this transition in the life of food allergies only continues to foster his sense that he can manage anything!

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The Peanut-Free Table October 17, 2012

I’m so proud of our school and so grateful to the head of our Lower School who is conscious of and working towards improving the emotional well-being of our food allergic students.

 

I have mixed feelings about the Peanut-Free Table at elementary schools.  While I appreciate that it helps teachers and administrators keep food allergic kids safe during lunchtime, I am concerned that it may exacerbate social issues that those kids already face.

 

Kids with food allergies already know what it’s like to feel excluded.  They are excluded all the time.  From the food at most in-class parties, from dessert at restaurants, treats at birthday parties, team celebrations, holidays, from the concession stand at the movies… the list could go on and on.

 

In the meantime, I had approached the head of our elementary school last year to discuss an idea I had.  After reading, The Peanut-Free Cafe, it occurred to me that we too could create a fun, desirable environment for our food allergic kids to enjoy.  They shouldn’t feel excluded from their class/friends’ tables.  We needed to create a space where food allergic kids could feel enthusiastic to eat!

 

The head happily agreed this was an idea we could work on!  Our school recently rebuilt its cafeteria and included an area, right near the beautiful wall-to-wall windows, where our school’s new “Peanut-Free Cafe” would go.  It is a space that, by year’s end, will be filled with the kids’ own artwork;  where they can invite their friends to join them.  And, where my son is excited to sit!

 

Costco’s Getting More Allergy-Friendly September 25, 2012

Need a safe snack to send to school?  Have a class party, soccer team to feed, play group snack to contribute to?  Check out what I found during one recent trip to our local Costco!    Has anyone tried these products?    I can only vouch for the School Safe Banana Chocolate Chip bread snacks which are delicious and perfect for school lunches/snacks.  They are nut-free and freezable (bonus for shelf life!).  My son loved the bread, so naturally I’m curious how the other snacks taste.

 

Note:  The popcorn was gluten-free but made in a facility with nuts.

 

 

Back to School Again! August 29, 2012

It’s that time again!  Some of you have already gone back to school while the rest of us are still preparing.  Now’s a great time to renew prescriptions for EpiPens and inhalers you may need to leave with the school nurse.  I’m republishing my post from last year which outlines my back-to-school process; including storing medications, ensuring safe snacks for my son, and preparing for special in-class celebrations.

 

Good luck to everyone on their first week!

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Starting a new school can be so exciting.  But it can also be daunting if you have a child with food allergies.  For some parents, this is the first time your child will be given food without your supervision.  And for others, it’s a point of transition to a new system for handling food allergies.  In both cases, it can be stressful.  But there’s a way to ease those nerves. Here’s how I would recommend handling everything to start your child’s year off right.

 
 

Understand Protocol:  First of all, talk to the school about your child’s food allergies and how they handle food allergies in general. It’s important to understand the standard procedures they have in place.

 

Store Emergency Medications:  Next, get a refill on your child’s EpiPens and keep them in their original packaging (most schools require this).  Keep two EpiPens at school (I kept ours in the classroom or at the nurse’s office) along with Children’s Benadryl.  Make a list of your child’s triggers and made a note of any symptoms he may have experienced to inform the teacher about his reactions.  In some cases, I didn’t know what my son’s reaction might be (thank goodness) so I deferred to my son’s pediatrician and allergist to give me a list of general reactions to look out for.

 

Ensure Safe Snack and Lunchtime:  Arrange a time to speak to your child’s teacher about snack and lunch.  Understand the process and how to work within it.  In my son’s case, the school provided snacks.  This originally horrified me.  I was uncomfortable about having the school give him snacks that I didn’t choose, but didn’t want him to feel left out if everyone was eating graham crackers and he was having rice cakes.  Thankfully, the school had a set snack list.  And, my son’s teacher took me through their snack closet and let me read the ingredients of every snack they provided.  Turns out he could safely eat eight of the ten snacks they regularly provided.  The teacher made a note of the two unsafe snacks and we agreed to substitute with a safe alternative on those days.

-OR- Leave a bag of safe snacks in the classroom for your child to choose from each day if that’s easier. Your child would probably be just as happy with that if you load up the safe snack bin with his/her favorites. Ask the teacher to let you know when you need to refill.

 

Prepare for Special Occassions:  Ask the teacher to alert you when in-class birthdays will be celebrated as well as any food-related holidays (think Halloween, Valentine’s Day, etc).  I send in a SAFE alternative on those days or keep one in class depending on the class/teacher (and it doesn’t have to be cupcakes!  For example, my son loves Golden Oreos and considers them a special treat).  But the teacher NEEDS to keep you posted on that stuff or it can result in a lot of disappointment.  **I would also make yourself available to parents who are planning these parties if they need safe snack suggestions.**

 

Inform and Practice Social Situations for Food Safety:  Now’s a great time to talk to your child/refresh her knowledge about her food allergy in some basic terms.  It’s a good time to check out the books recommended here: Food Allergy Books For Young Children and here:  Helping Toddlers Understand Their Nut Allergies.  Arm him/her with some words to politely decline sharing offers and remind him to ask his teacher if he’s not sure of the safety of something.  Have your child practice with you so they feel more comfortable using these techniques at school.

 

Educate Peers:  Offer to inform the other students in your child’s class about food allergies.  Educating your child’s peers will empower them to keep him/her safe as well.  Many kids have no experience with food allergies at all.  Bring in a book about food allergies along with a safe snack for everyone to share.  Let them ask questions and let your child help answer some of those questions.  My son’s classmates were so supportive once they understood he couldn’t always share the snacks provided.  In several instances, his close friends offered to eat some of his safe snacks in solidarity with him during class parties.  And, by the way, nearly all of his pals now love Golden Oreos as a result.  And some classmates, will ask their parents NOT to pack peanut butter/nuts so they can safely sit next to my son at lunch.  How wonderful!

 

I hope my on-the-ground experience helps alleviate a little of those back-to-school jitters and gives you some ideas of how to proceed at your school.  I was nervous at first when my son began school, but it’s been great — allergies and all!