Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

The Language of a Food Allergic Reaction September 11, 2017

A food allergic reaction can vary from mild to severe and typically takes place shortly after eating or exposure.  All reactions require immediate attention.  But with severe allergic reactions, called anaphylaxis, minutes matter.

 

As kids head back to school and begin new activities, it’s important for EVERYONE to become familiar with the symptoms of anaphylaxis and what it language a young child might use to describe it.

 

Symptoms of Severe reaction

Some of the symptoms of a severe reaction are obvious: hives, vomiting, coughing.  But for others, we need to rely on verbal clues.  Young children may describe an allergic reaction a little differently than adults would.

 

Language of Food Allergic Reaction

 

Should you suspect that your child, or one in your care, is experiencing anaphylaxis, act immediately:

  1. Administer epinephrine, holding pen for 5-10 seconds in meaty part of outer thigh.
  2. Call 911.
  3. Contact parents.

 

Minutes matter when it comes to treating anaphylaxis.  Knowing the symptoms and the different ways it might be described will help you save a life.

 

 

6 Sensational Books for Kids with Food Allergies December 19, 2016

The holidays are just days away!  Try giving a book that a family with food allergies will treasure.  Or, donate a book to your child’s classroom or school library!

 

Despite the growing number of cases, food allergic kids often feel alone with their allergy. It is so important for kids with food allergies to see this aspect of themselves reflected in literature and elsewhere.  Plus, these books are great teaching tools for both a child with a food allergy as well as their siblings and classmates!

 

1.The Bugabees – Friends with Food Allergies, by Amy Recob
Ages: preschool – 7
bugabees-book
Beautifully and colorfully illustrated, The Bugabees is a story about eight insect friends who each have one of the different Top 8 food allergies.  They talk about their need to stay away from various treats and lightly touch on allergic symptoms they might experience.  Importantly, the bugs each repeat a mantra for kids with food allergies which reinforces that they can have fun without their allergen!  My daughter immediately noted that her brother has food allergies and was singing along with their rhythmic mantra by the end!

 

bugybops-book

2.  The BugyBops – Friends for All Time is the sequel in which the Bugabees friends learn about why their friends avoid certain foods, what an EpiPen is and why it’s important, and what they can do to keep their friends safe.  This is a fantastic companion book to The Bugabees!  I would highly recommend for a classroom visit and school library.
Ages: preschool – 8

 

3. Joey Panda and His Food Allergies Save the Day: A Children’s Book, by Amishi S. Murthy, MD and Vivian Chou, MD
Ages: Preschool – 8
joey-panda-book

Written by two pediatric allergists, the story of Joey Panda – a kid with multiple food allergies who is nervous about his first day of school, a situation that many food allergy families face.  To Joey’s surprise, not only does he find out that many of his new friends are already familiar with food allergies but that he has the knowledge and power to become a superstar.  This is story that acknowledges a child’s fears about going to a new school with food allergies and turns it into a story of empowerment.  Just the kind I love!

 

4.  The Peanut Pickle, A Story About Peanut Allergy, by Jessica Jacobs
Ages: 3-8

peanut-pickle-book

Ben has a peanut allergy.  Sometimes he finds it hard to talk about.  But now that he’s six, he’s finding ways to tell family and friends about his food allergy.  Kids with food allergies will recognize themselves in Ben and the situations he faces – important for children who often feel alone with their allergy.  This is a great book for your child to practice what to say to keep him or herself safe.

 

5.  The Princess and the Peanut Allergy, by Wendy McClure
Ages: 5-9
The Princess and the Peanut Allergy

Centered around two best friends, Paula and Regina.  Regina wants a nut-laden cake for her birthday.  Her friend, Paula is allergic to peanuts – causing problems for them both.  The girls have an argument that is ultimately resolved when Regina realizes that having her nut-filled cake may compromise her friendship with Paula.  And, Regina surprises her friend by ordering her birthday cake nut-free.  The princess and pea analogy used to enlighten Regina works as a way of explaining that even the smallest bit of peanut could be extremely harmful to someone who is allergic to them.  Importantly, the book addresses some of the social issues that can arise from having a food allergy and helps articulate conflict resolution in an age-appropriate way.

 

6.  The Peanut-Free Cafe, by Gloria Koster
Ages: 5-9Grant is a new student at the Nutley School – where everyone enjoys PB&J at lunch. As a result, he’s forced to eat by himself at a peanut-free table.  In an effort get to know him, the school offers an irresistible peanut-free cafe for anyone willing to give up their peanut butter.  This story is clever and the idea of a creating a peanut-free cafe at our house and at his school greatly excited my son!

 

 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)

 

Back to School Again! August 29, 2012

It’s that time again!  Some of you have already gone back to school while the rest of us are still preparing.  Now’s a great time to renew prescriptions for EpiPens and inhalers you may need to leave with the school nurse.  I’m republishing my post from last year which outlines my back-to-school process; including storing medications, ensuring safe snacks for my son, and preparing for special in-class celebrations.

 

Good luck to everyone on their first week!

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Starting a new school can be so exciting.  But it can also be daunting if you have a child with food allergies.  For some parents, this is the first time your child will be given food without your supervision.  And for others, it’s a point of transition to a new system for handling food allergies.  In both cases, it can be stressful.  But there’s a way to ease those nerves. Here’s how I would recommend handling everything to start your child’s year off right.

 
 

Understand Protocol:  First of all, talk to the school about your child’s food allergies and how they handle food allergies in general. It’s important to understand the standard procedures they have in place.

 

Store Emergency Medications:  Next, get a refill on your child’s EpiPens and keep them in their original packaging (most schools require this).  Keep two EpiPens at school (I kept ours in the classroom or at the nurse’s office) along with Children’s Benadryl.  Make a list of your child’s triggers and made a note of any symptoms he may have experienced to inform the teacher about his reactions.  In some cases, I didn’t know what my son’s reaction might be (thank goodness) so I deferred to my son’s pediatrician and allergist to give me a list of general reactions to look out for.

 

Ensure Safe Snack and Lunchtime:  Arrange a time to speak to your child’s teacher about snack and lunch.  Understand the process and how to work within it.  In my son’s case, the school provided snacks.  This originally horrified me.  I was uncomfortable about having the school give him snacks that I didn’t choose, but didn’t want him to feel left out if everyone was eating graham crackers and he was having rice cakes.  Thankfully, the school had a set snack list.  And, my son’s teacher took me through their snack closet and let me read the ingredients of every snack they provided.  Turns out he could safely eat eight of the ten snacks they regularly provided.  The teacher made a note of the two unsafe snacks and we agreed to substitute with a safe alternative on those days.

-OR- Leave a bag of safe snacks in the classroom for your child to choose from each day if that’s easier. Your child would probably be just as happy with that if you load up the safe snack bin with his/her favorites. Ask the teacher to let you know when you need to refill.

 

Prepare for Special Occassions:  Ask the teacher to alert you when in-class birthdays will be celebrated as well as any food-related holidays (think Halloween, Valentine’s Day, etc).  I send in a SAFE alternative on those days or keep one in class depending on the class/teacher (and it doesn’t have to be cupcakes!  For example, my son loves Golden Oreos and considers them a special treat).  But the teacher NEEDS to keep you posted on that stuff or it can result in a lot of disappointment.  **I would also make yourself available to parents who are planning these parties if they need safe snack suggestions.**

 

Inform and Practice Social Situations for Food Safety:  Now’s a great time to talk to your child/refresh her knowledge about her food allergy in some basic terms.  It’s a good time to check out the books recommended here: Food Allergy Books For Young Children and here:  Helping Toddlers Understand Their Nut Allergies.  Arm him/her with some words to politely decline sharing offers and remind him to ask his teacher if he’s not sure of the safety of something.  Have your child practice with you so they feel more comfortable using these techniques at school.

 

Educate Peers:  Offer to inform the other students in your child’s class about food allergies.  Educating your child’s peers will empower them to keep him/her safe as well.  Many kids have no experience with food allergies at all.  Bring in a book about food allergies along with a safe snack for everyone to share.  Let them ask questions and let your child help answer some of those questions.  My son’s classmates were so supportive once they understood he couldn’t always share the snacks provided.  In several instances, his close friends offered to eat some of his safe snacks in solidarity with him during class parties.  And, by the way, nearly all of his pals now love Golden Oreos as a result.  And some classmates, will ask their parents NOT to pack peanut butter/nuts so they can safely sit next to my son at lunch.  How wonderful!

 

I hope my on-the-ground experience helps alleviate a little of those back-to-school jitters and gives you some ideas of how to proceed at your school.  I was nervous at first when my son began school, but it’s been great — allergies and all!

 

Expired EpiPens? EpiPhany! October 21, 2011

After being inspired to clean out some spaces in my house that haven’t received much attention recently, I amazingly stumbled upon a large stash of expired EpiPens.  I was holding on to them with the thought that they might be useful in some way or in need of special disposal, but instead they simply sat in the back of a closet.

 

Suddenly I had an epiphany (an EpiPhany if you will).   Instead of throwing them out, I brought the EpiPens into our school nurse to help train other teachers, assistants, interns and substitutes on the administration of an EpiPen.  More than 15% of food allergic children experience a food allergy reaction while at school.  Given that statistic, emergency training with real EpiPens is only to everyone’s benefit (not least of which is my own son).

 

So, consider donating your expired EpiPens to your local school, preschool, camp or daycare facility and spread the word to any allergic adults you may know.  Our nurse was excited to use our old EpiPens and to store our old trainers for faculty food allergy training and I felt great putting them all to good use.

 

Food Allergy Books for Young Children April 19, 2011

While waiting in our allergist’s office today, I noticed two great books geared towards offering young children an understanding of their food allergies that I wanted to share.

The first is called The BugaBees; Friends with Food Allergies,  a children’s curiosity and education award-winner.  The BugaBee friends encounter a variety of situations each of which conflict with one of their food allergies.  Each BugaBee learns to politely say, “No thanks” to a particular food explaining that they can have fun without it.  The rhymes are clever, the illustrations bright and captivating and it will be as relatable to a kid (like mine) who has multiple food allergies as it is to a child with only one.

Available online at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble and other major retailers.

The other book is titled, Why Am I Different? by Naomi Antenucci.  This was particularly apropos today as my son was asking why he had food allergies and his friends didn’t – a question that inevitably arises from time to time from every food allergic child.   Simple stated and written for toddler through preschool age children, it helped my 6 year old recognize that everyone is different in one way or another and the book served as a good primer for my 3 year old.

Available for purchase through the FAAN website.

 

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)