Allergy Shmallergy

Simplifying life for families with food allergies.

Allergy-Friendly Hanukkah Doughnuts: Buy Them, Make Them, Eat Them! December 12, 2017

חנוכה - Hanukkah (5235439434)

As a food allergy consultant to schools, I get asked all kinds of questions and involved in all sorts of projects.  Recently, I received a fun assignment!  My daughter’s school asked me to find a safe doughnut to help them celebrate Hanukkah while adhering to their strict nut-free policy.

 

Hanukkah is celebrated over eight nights – recognizing the miracle of the burning oil in the ancient Temple of Jerusalem.  Recognizing that miracle, celebrants everywhere look forward to the tradition of indulging in food fried in oil each night, including doughnuts!  I mean, if we must…

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Traditionally, Jews serve sufganiyot, a jelly doughnut during Hanukkah.  The Big Bang Theorys Mayim Bialik offers this awesome vegan recipe (which means it’s dairy and egg-free!):

Mayim Bialik’s “Unbelievably Delicious” Holiday Recipe – Hanukkah Sufganiyot

 

I will acknowledge, doughnut making can be time consuming and messy!  Preparing doughnuts from scratch is also tough if you’re trying to feed a crowd.  Krispy Kreme used to be the go-to Hanukah doughnuts for my own family as well as for the classrooms I teach in.  Now that Krispy Kreme donuts are decidedly not safe, where can you buy a nut-free doughnut?

 

Enter Katz’s Gluten-Free Donuts.  Sold in boxes of 6, these doughnuts are gluten-free, dairy-free, nut-free and soy-free!  You can find them in the kosher frozen food section of the supermarket.  There’s no preparation necessary – just thaw.  Or, for a mouthwatering experience, heat up for a few seconds in the microwave.  (I’m drooling as I write this…)

 

 

Be sure to check out our list of Allergy-Friendly BakeriesDun Well Donuts, The Donut Pub, Brandon’s Best Allergen-Free Sweets ‘N Treats and Amazing Donuts are just a few bakeries on our list that make doughnuts reviewers rave about.  There may be a bakery near you!  (And, if your favorite allergy-friendly bakery isn’t on the list, shoot us a note!)

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Deck the Halls: Allergy-Friendly Gingerbread House Round-Up December 4, 2017

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No one should miss out on holiday traditions.  But families with food allergies are hesitant to participate in activities that revolve around food, particularly baked goods.  Baked goods are often cross-contaminated with nuts and typically contain dairy and eggs – three of the top eight allergens responsible for 90% of allergic reactions.

 

Now with the options below, there’s no reason to sit out the holidays!  Check out these allergy-friendly gingerbread house ideas.  Everyone can gather together and decorate a gingerbread dream home safely!

 

BUY IT:

A&J Bakery’s Allergen Friendly Gingerbread House

If you’re lucky enough to live in Rhode Island, you might want to pop into A&J Bakery to grab their Allergen Friendly Gingerbread House Kit.  Otherwise, you’ll want to place an order now!  In addition to being vegan, these gingerbread houses are free from peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, gluten, wheat, soy and dairy.  The kit comes with the house (assembly required), five different types of allergen-friendly candy to decorate it with as well as some non-edible decorations.

 

Manischewitz Chanukah House

Finally, a Chanukah-themed house!  Manischewitz’s Chanukah House is made with vanilla cookie (a preferred flavor in my house).  Plus, it is nut-free, dairy-free and egg-free!  We have used this kit and it couldn’t be easier to put together and the walls are very sturdy – it surely could survive a candy hurricane (or a not-so-gentle little sister)!

 

MAKE IT!

Did you know that LEGO has a Gingerbread House!  It’s made of Legos, so it’s guaranteed to be allergen-free!

 

Melissa and Doug Mess-Free Glitter Christmas Tree and Gingerbread House

Baby, it’s cold outside!  Make today a craft day indoors with this foam decorating kit.  Kids can decorate it anyway they like without allergens OR mess!  A win-win for parents and kids alike!

 

If you’re determined to make the edible kind, you can use these easy-to-work-with Silicone Molds to create consistent and detailed gingerbread house parts.  [See below for gluten-free recipe!]

 

Sweet Ali’s Gluten-Free Bakery in Illinois has a great recipe posted along with How-To instructions for assembling a gluten-free gingerbread house.  Check it out!

 

DON’T FORGET!

 

There are all kinds of ways to make gingerbread houses using milk cartons, like we did in elementary school.  You can use icing to stick safe graham crackers to the sides of a small size carton of milk (8 or 16 oz size).  (Remember to wash the carton thoroughly before using if you are allergic to dairy.)  You could line the carton with candy canes or pretzel rods to make a delicious log cabin.  OR, you can line the carton in craft paper and decorate it with stickers, buttons, pipe cleaners, etc using glue!

A NOTE ABOUT ROYAL ICING and RECIPE:

 

Royal Icing (the kind used to stick candy to gingerbread houses) often contains egg.  But making royal icing is fairly easy and fun to do with kids.  Try this recipe:

2 cup *sifted* powdered sugar

4-5 tablespoons water

Combine sugar and 4 tbsp of water until smooth.  Continue adding small amounts of water until glossy and thick.

As I understand it, powdered sugar and water icings don’t do well in pastry bags (for piping).  We usually use a knife to carefully line the edges of the house parts and paint them directly on to the candy before sticking them on to our houses.

 

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping at risk families with food allergies.)

 

The Dangers of a Dairy Allergy November 17, 2017

cereal and milk pixabay StockSnap

 

Three year old, Elijah Silvera, was attending a regular day of preschool in New York City recently, when preschool workers fed him a grilled cheese sandwich despite school papers which formally documented his severe dairy allergy.  Elijah had a severe allergic reaction and went into anaphylaxis.  Standard procedure for anaphylaxis is to administer epinephrine and call 911 immediately.  Instead, the school called Elijah’s mother, who picked up her child and drove him to the hospital herself.  Doctors in the emergency room tried but were unable to save him.

 

Dairy allergy is the most common food allergy among young children.  And, although the peanut can produce some of the most severe allergic reactions (as well as some of the most tragic headlines), an allergy to milk products can be life-threatening.  The myth that a dairy allergy is not serious and doesn’t require as much vigilance causes great frustration to many who are allergic to milk, as does the idea that a food is “allergy free” if it does not contain nuts. To those who live with it, a dairy allergy requires an enormous amount of preparation and education since milk is an ingredient in so many products.

 

Dairy is cow’s milk and found in all cow’s milk products, such as cream, butter, cheese, and yogurt.  Doctors sometimes advise patients with a dairy allergy to avoid other animals’ milk (such as goat) because the protein it contains may be similar to cow and could cause a reaction.  Reactions to dairy vary from hives and itching to swelling and vomiting, to more severe symptoms such as wheezing, difficulty breathing, and anaphylaxis.  Strictly avoiding products containing milk is the best way to prevent a reaction.  The only way to help stop a severe food allergy reaction is with epinephrine; patients should always carry two epinephrine auto-injectors with them at all times.

 

Just like other allergens, cross contamination is a concern for those with a dairy allergy. Even a small amount of milk protein could be enough to cause a reaction. For example, butter and powdered cheese (like the kind you might find on potato chips) are easily spreadable in a pan, within a classroom or on a playground.  And, as with other allergens, hand sanitizer does NOT remove the proteins that cause allergic reactions.  Doctors recommend hand washing with good old soap and water – but wipes work in a pinch.

 

Those allergic to dairy must not only avoid food; they often have to look out for health and beauty products too.  Dairy can be found in vitamins, shampoo, and lotions.  It is critical to read the ingredient labels of every product you buy each time you buy it as ingredients and manufacturing procedures may change.

 

In the United States, any food product containing milk or a milk derivative must be listed as DAIRY or MILK under the current labeling laws (see The Ins and Outs of Reading Food Labels, Aug. 2016).  If you are living or traveling elsewhere, this list of some alternative names for dairy may be useful:

 

milk (in all forms: goat, whole, skim, 1%, 2%, evaporated, dry, condensed, etc)
butter (including artificial butter and margarine)
cream
buttermilk
sour cream
half and half
yogurt
cheese
ice cream
custard
sherbet
pudding
chocolate
ghee
whey (all forms)
casein
caseinates (all forms)
casein hydrolysate
lactose
lactulose
lactoferrin
lactalbumin (all forms)
diacetyl
rennet casein

 

Let’s spread the facts about dairy allergy so that our schools and teachers better understand how to accommodate and care for students with food allergies.   Any allergen can produce severe, life-threatening allergic reactions and all food allergies should be taken seriously and managed with attention.  I sincerely  hope that by informing others we can prevent another tragedy like the one the Silvera family was forced to experience.

 

Prep Your Meds for School: Refill Options July 28, 2017

Time to get your emergency medications ready for school.  Don’t worry:  there’s still lots of summer fun to be had!  But to maximize summer fun over back-to-school frenzy, there are a few things you can do.

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  1. Check the Date:  Check the expiration dates on your epinephrine auto-injectors.  If they are due to expire between now and December, it may be a good time to consider refilling your prescription.
  2. Know Your Options:
    • There are several choices of epinephrine auto-injectors these days and they all efficiently deliver the same life-saving drug (epinephrine) in different ways.  I’ll outline those different auto-injectors below.
    • Talk to your doctor and consider your lifestyle when choosing your auto-injector.
    • Be sure you, your school nurse, caretaker, and child are all familiar with how to operate the auto-injector(s) you choose to stock at home, school and elsewhere.
  3. Update Your Emergency Action Plan:  Your doctor may have provided you with one or you can take Allergy Shmallergy’s Emergency Action Plan to your doctor on your next appointment.  Make a copy for home, your car, on-the-go, and school.
  4. Ask Directly:  You may need to ask your doctor specifically for the auto-injector you wish to use.  Some doctors prescribe only one without discussion, but are certainly willing to write a prescription for the auto-injector that works best for you.

 

What ARE the options for epinephrine auto-injector:

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Auvi-Q:

Yes, it’s back on the market and better than ever.  Auvi-Q delivers epinephrine via a compact package that speaks to you.  You heard that right: it talks you through an injection, even counting down the length of time you are supposed to hold the device in place.  Plus, the needle automatically retracts, reducing the possibility of post-injection injury.  Each Auvi-Q is about the size of a deck of playing cards, easy to carry for everyone (especially teens, young adults and fathers – who can fit them in their pockets).

 

*Auvi-Q automatically ships and delivers their auto-injectors directly to you.  Initiate this process with your doctor.  To read more about their direct delivery service as well as their cost-coverage programs, refer to the Affordability program page.

 

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Adrenaclick:

Adrenaclick has a slimmer profile than the well-know EpiPen, but is about the same length. Adrenaclick is a no frills epinephrine auto-injector, often used as a generic for EpiPen.  In fact, responding to the rising costs of brand name epinephrine auto-injectors, CVS pharmacies (among others) replaced its stock of auto-injectors with Adrenaclick. In their words, “Patients can now purchase the authorized generic for Adrenaclick®… This authorized generic is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved device with the same active ingredient as other epinephrine auto-injector devices.”

 

*IMPORTANT, Adrenaclick operates differently than EpiPens and they DO NOT come with a trainer.  If you choose to use this useful auto-injector, be sure to also place an order for an Andrenaclick trainer.  And, do your research for best pricing locally.

 

EpiPen:

EpiPens are the most widely used and most familiar of the epinephrine auto-injectors.  In fact, its familiarity is what keeps many customers coming back.  School nurses and even non-allergic individuals may be more accustomed to its look and how to use it.  In addition, EpiPens are substantial – making them easy to find in a backpack or purse.  In 2016 Mylan, the manufacturers of EpiPen, released a generic of its own product in response to public pressure over its pricing.  Both products contain the same medication and use the same or similar injector mechanisms.  EpiPen’s price has not been reduced in any way and is the most expensive auto-injector on the market.  The generic version is less expensive, but still a price worth considering for many.

*Mylan does offer coupons which can be found on their website.

 

Best Allergy Blogs of 2017 May 8, 2017

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Healthline compiles a list of each year’s best allergy blogs each of whom serves as a valuable resource to its readers.

 

Allergy Shmallergy is once again thrilled to be on this list and amongst such fantastic company.  I’m an avid reader of many of my co-honorees!

 

Thank you to those at Healthline for being an excellent resource to us all.  And congrats to all those on the list!

 

Click here to check out all the wonderful and motivated writers, advocates and innovators who are trying to make life better and easier for those with food allergies.

 

 

Fun for Everyone: Candy Bar Birthday Party April 12, 2017

I wish I could take credit for this adorable idea.  But I can’t.  My friend is just a genius.

 

Her own kids aren’t allergic, but my thoughtful and creative friend had kids with food allergies on her mind when she thought about what special treat her daughter could share with ALL of her party guests.  Like my friend, many parents are concerned with how to be inclusive of guests with food allergies.  Sometimes, the best answer is also the simplest.

 

After singing a rowdy chorus of “Happy Birthday” to our favorite 7 year old, the kids were each given a festive party bag that they could fill with any (or ALL) of their favorite candy.  Best of all, everything was dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free and most was also gluten-free.  There’s nothing that makes a child happier than being included in on the fun!

 

Plus, no goodie bag needed!  The kids all got to bring their loot home.  HUGE bonus in my opinion!

 

If you’re going to replicate this fantastic idea, I would recommend a few things:

  1.  Check Allergy Shmallergy’s Safe List of Nut-Free Candy page.  This is not a comprehensive list.  And, it doesn’t account for other allergies.  But you’ll find that many of the candies listed are also dairy-free, egg-free and gluten-free.  Read ingredient lists carefully and if you have any doubts of an item’s safety, snap a photo and email the child’s parent to verify.
  2. Save ingredient lists and bring them to the party.  If anything needs to be double-checked, you’ll have all your information at hand.
  3. Be careful when serving similar looking items (like M&Ms and Skittles).  Not only is chance of cross-contamination a concern with unwrapped candy, but I’ve seen unsafe candy fall into safe candy bowls.  For the purposes of a party, I would stick to the idea that “everything on the table is safe for party guests” principle.

 

Look at this fun, inviting table set up!
Looking for containers and scoops like the ones above?

Set of 12 Clear Plastic Candy Scoops

Penny Candy Jars (set of 2)

Amcan Scalloped Container, Large

Vista Premium Quality Plastic 10″ Serving Bowl (set of 2)


  
Smarties.  A classic!


Caught red handed!  My son and his best friend/brother of the birthday girl.

(Thank you in advance! A portion of the proceeds of the affiliate links go toward AllergyStrong.org – an organization aimed at helping low income and at risk families with food allergies.)

 

IMPORTANT: EpiPen Recall April 1, 2017

IMG_3211Expanding on its recall in other countries, Mylan is now recalling EpiPens in the United States.

 

The recall began when reports of two devices outside of the U.S. failed to activate due to a potential defect in a supplier component.

 

According to Mylan, “The potential defect could make the device difficult to activate in an emergency (failure to activate or increased force needed to activate) and have significant health consequences for a patient experiencing a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). ”

 

As a precaution, Mylan is recalling EpiPens made my their manufacturer, Meridian Medical Technologies, between December 2015 and July 2016.  This recall applies to both their EpiPen Jr. dose (0.15mg) and their regular dose (0.3mg).   The recall does NOT affect generic EpiPens introduced in December 2016.

 

Please see below for lot numbers and expiration dates.  Remember to check any EpiPen sets you may have including those outside of your home (for example, at school, daycare or a relative’s house).  Mylan said that recalled EpiPens will be replaced at no cost to the consumer.

 

For more information as well as product replacement information, please visit Mylan’s site directly.

 

Mylan EpiPen recall April 2017*Please share widely with friends and family as well as school administrators and nurses.*

 

UPDATE:

If your EpiPens are affected by the recall:

  1.  Contact Stericycle to obtain a voucher code for a free, new replacement EpiPen.  Stericycle: 877-650-3494.  Stericycle will send you a pre-paid return package to ship back your recalled EpiPens.
  2. Bring your voucher information to your local pharmacy to receive your free replacement EpiPens.
  3. Send your recalled EpiPens back to Stericycle using their packaging.  Remember: DO NOT send back your recalled EpiPens until you have replacements in hand.

 

Mylan continues to update its recall page with their latest information at mylan.com/epipenrecall.